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    Emergency Cards

    taken from www.blackletter.org:
    Emergency Card Rant

    By: Two Truck Ted

    I heard you had a postcard or something with all of your emergency information on it. Do you have something I could look at so I can make my own?

    Several years ago I was at a local dealer and overheard an old salt talking about how placing a "DO NOT REMOVE" sticker on a helmet was simply not enough, that every rider should carry an easy to find sheet of paper with all his emergency info. He continued that much like a pistol (his words when needed it should be easy to find and easy to use. Well that made perfect sense to me so I set about trying to figure out the best way to do this. I came up with a solution that has (literally) worked for me.


    I started by asking what info would people need to know and how should I design it so it can be kept handy. I ended up designing a card that would fit where I decided to keep it, printing it on orange paper, laminating it, keeping it in the left breast pocket of my Aerostich, and printing a label (Brother P-Touch from work that states in capital letters, "EMERGENCY INFO IN LEFT BREAST POCKET" and placing it on both the chin bar of my helmet and on the back as well.

    Sounds easy, right? Well actually it is

    DESIGNING THE CARD

    What info do you want on this card? Well, first and foremost, what info is an EMT going to need to know right away if you can't tell him or her? I decided my name, age, allergies, blood type, medical conditions, organ donor status & name and number of my Doctor. Second, someone will need to contact your family — I decided my Father's name and various numbers, and a backup if he cannot be reached. That pretty much filled up one side of the card. On the other side, I put all my own information, including my full name, my social security number, my health insurance company and account number, the make, year, model, and license plate number of the bike, my vehicle insurance company and account number, and the number of my bike dealer (your dealer can be amazingly helpful when it counts, but make sure you discuss beforehand what things you can expect from him.) Here is a link to my card template in the MS Word format.

    CREATING THE CARD

    I made great use of small fonts to cram all the information in. It really needed to be printed by a laser printer at the inkjet just made it too hard to read. Personally, I tried to do this at my office and simply ended up taking the .doc file on a 3.5" disk to a local Kinko's and had them print it out on thick orange/yellow stock paper. They then laminated it for me for a few dollars more. It took all of about 10 minutes, and I had them make a second that I put in my other riding jacket so I wouldn't have to swap them back and forth.

    You could easily write out the info on a file card freehand, but do you really want someone trying to figure out whether it is a "7" or a "1" in a situation when the card is really needed?

    PLACING THE CARD

    I decided that the easiest place, and the place many folks would first look anyway, was the left front breast pocket. I never use the pocket anyway as it is NOT waterproof on the Aerostich and anything in there will get soaked in a rain storm. Pick your own pocket if you will, just make sure that it is easy to get to from the perspective of someone who knows nothing about motorcycling, much less that 24 or so pockets in the Aerostich Roadcrafter.

    Lastly, tell people where to find it. I always wear a helmet and as that is the first place EMT's usually attend to, I put the label front and back just to make sure. I used a labelmaker from the office, but true to form, Kinko's has those too for a decent price (and you can get different color label tape…)

    MY EXPERIENCE

    In July of 1999 I was involved in a serious motorcycle accident. The EMT's immediately found my emergency card (allergy info sure came in handy!) and copied down the needed info, then passed it along to the investigating officer who used it to notify my family, then along to the folks at the hospital. Without exception, everyone who used it remarked how helpful it was (unfortunately even the Hospital billing administrator

    (Thanks to some Frank for this one )



    This and other articles are reprinted in the UTMC with the permission of Ted Virrill. Ted Virrill aka 2TruckTed used to ride a killer black BMW K1100RS until July of 1999 when he got smacked down by two...yes two big trucks. Not this pansy chevy silverado fluff I whine about, real 18 wheeler sorta pain!. He's still recuperating and is currently on the hunt for a restorable R60/2 or R27 and you can read more on his webpage here: http://www.verrill.com/moto/moto.htm. He's also a member of and deeply connected in several BMW Motorcycle organizations, including the local BMW organization - the BMWBMW, two National organizations - the BMWMOA & The BMW RA, the Internet BMW Riders - the IBMWR, and the Internet Rec.Moto group - the DoD. He is also a past board member, webmaster, and newsletter editor of BMWBMW. Is it just me or does this guy get allot done eh?
    1988 "BlackHawk" project
    1989 "RallyHawk" is Chuck's now!
    1988 "The Gray" Tempest Gray Metallic stocker

    I can't tell you how peaceful it is. Shinya Kimura
    People who know ride Hawks. Riot

    #2
    Great Idea!

    I think the best place would be printed directly on your helmet or jacket!

    I will be creating a card for myself today, never know when some jackass cager will decide to plow me down!
    '89 NT650 Hawk GT
    '91 CR125
    '99 KX250
    '97 S-10 (AKA Bike Hauler)

    Comment


      #3
      WWW.CYCLEGADGETS.COM has an emergency information stick on pocket and card that attches to your helmet!...best part is 1 free per address per month!

      http://www.cyclegadgets.com/Products....asp?Item=MICS


      Comment


        #4
        You could also put a contact number on your mobile phone under the name of:-
        ICE Incase Of Emergency
        "Life may begin at 40, but it doesn't get real interesting until about 150."

        • '88 in Candy Flair Blue + '90 in Italian Red
        • Ohlins Rear Shock
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        • VFR750 rear wheel
        • Hiperform seat&headers
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        Comment


          #5
          I was all set to write it all on my helmet with a paint marker, when I realized that stuff like my social security # etc. are not things I like to prominently display.

          Zooom, that little info pouch is perfect. I'm getting one for each helmet... one month at a time...
          1988 "BlackHawk" project
          1989 "RallyHawk" is Chuck's now!
          1988 "The Gray" Tempest Gray Metallic stocker

          I can't tell you how peaceful it is. Shinya Kimura
          People who know ride Hawks. Riot

          Comment


            #6
            Sweet..I just ordered on of those..Thanks, great post!!

            Comment


              #7
              The emergency card thing is flawed in that keeping it on your helmet or jacket or bike puts it in serious danger and concealing it within your clothes keeps it out of sight. It's not a bad idea to have the tags, but there's no way I'm trusting my life to them.

              Something to keep in mind before wasting money on "cards" like often discussed is that paramedics are trained to check your neck for dog tags or other form of idenification. I carry dog tags.

              ...however, a quality set of dog tags will cost $15 ~ 50 and the engraving will run another $50, but there's next to no chance of losing them in a wreck and a significantly greater chance that they will save your life than cards and "wallet" information.
              Want a 5.5" rear wheel? Click Here

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                #8
                What information do you put on the dog tags? How much will fit, other than name/blood type/allergies/medical conditions? I was lucky to get everything on the card, front and back...
                1988 "BlackHawk" project
                1989 "RallyHawk" is Chuck's now!
                1988 "The Gray" Tempest Gray Metallic stocker

                I can't tell you how peaceful it is. Shinya Kimura
                People who know ride Hawks. Riot

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally Posted by Makenzie71
                  The emergency card thing is flawed in that keeping it on your helmet or jacket or bike puts it in serious danger and concealing it within your clothes keeps it out of sight. It's not a bad idea to have the tags, but there's no way I'm trusting my life to them.

                  Something to keep in mind before wasting money on "cards" like often discussed is that paramedics are trained to check your neck for dog tags or other form of idenification. I carry dog tags.

                  ...however, a quality set of dog tags will cost $15 ~ 50 and the engraving will run another $50, but there's next to no chance of losing them in a wreck and a significantly greater chance that they will save your life than cards and "wallet" information.
                  you forget that EMT's on the site of a motorcycle accident are also trained to look at the helmet too!....hence why the MICS carrier is universally accepted...some track day organizations give them out before you go out on the track and ask that it be filled out and adhered onto the helmet as part of tech inspection....also....since dog tags can flip around....I'd hate to be flung in a high side and it turned so that the edge of it cuts into me...and yes...they can do that even with that little rubber ring around it still!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    [quote="zooom"]
                    Originally Posted by Makenzie71
                    you forget that EMT's on the site of a motorcycle accident are also trained to look at the helmet too!....hence why the MICS carrier is universally accepted...some track day organizations give them out before you go out on the track and ask that it be filled out and adhered onto the helmet as part of tech inspection....also....since dog tags can flip around....I'd hate to be flung in a high side and it turned so that the edge of it cuts into me...and yes...they can do that even with that little rubber ring around it still!
                    Not ALL emt's are trained to look for information on the helmet...not even all metropoletin emt's are trained to do that. Further, I've seen way too many accidents that pulled a propperly worn helmet off...no one's going to look at the helmet if it's 50ft away.

                    The likelyhood of you "landing" on dog tags in manner that would cause damage to your body is pretty similar to being struck by lightning. Also, my dog tags never "flip" and I'm not too sure how you can think that's really possible.
                    Want a 5.5" rear wheel? Click Here

                    Comment


                      #11
                      ALL EMT'S I know have told me that as a part of their training as a 1st responder to look at the helmet for impacts to assess if they are dealing with any possible head trauma...as well as looking at the eyes for dialation and asking questions to assess conciousness,awareness,and functional thinking for the purpose of concussion symptoms....if you are in an area where they are not doing that...then I'd strongly urge you to contact the local government and find out why the hell not!....and as far as looking at the helmet in discovery of impacts...is when they'll discover the MICS and get any data they cannot get from the person...and unless you are in a state that has no required helmet law...1st responders will in fact look for a helmet if 1 is not immediatly visable or on your nugget unless you are dead on the scene or sooo drastically thrown that finding you is more of a chore than that of an initial response alone....in which case as they try and recontruct things for discovery they'll probably find it anyway! (in the case of it being found 50ft away as you suggest)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        oh and BTW...as far as the dogtags vs lightning comparo...that is a pretty far fetched comparison....I am betting that maybe not in your case...but in alot of peoples cases that there is enough play in the torso of your jacket for it to allow room enough for a dogtag to flip or flop...like in the valley or cavity between your breasts...which if say for instance you are in a highside rotation in the air flailing your limbs...the dogtag could do just that and as you came down on your chest it could buckle into you....seen it happen with pocket change and money clips where they make a noticeable impression on the body in the case of an impact...sometimes only in the form of a bruise...but an impression nonetheless!...and that my friend is a whole lot more likely to happen than lightning striking you!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          how bout a me-tag?....all important info tattooed on your inner arm
                          Lord Squidward of FloriDUH

                          Comment


                            #14
                            What if your insurance info changes? Do you cross it out?
                            1988 "BlackHawk" project
                            1989 "RallyHawk" is Chuck's now!
                            1988 "The Gray" Tempest Gray Metallic stocker

                            I can't tell you how peaceful it is. Shinya Kimura
                            People who know ride Hawks. Riot

                            Comment

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