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    Rider error or mechanical?

    So I’ve had my hawk about a week and have driven it a couple times. It’s my first bike so I do expect a learning curve, however I’m having an issue that seems to me is not user error. Please correct me if I’m wrong.

    When I open the throttle while coasting, the engine will rev but there is a delay in (any) power to the wheel causing a hard jerk and afterwards it accelerates fine. I don’t notice it when “slipping” (?) the clutch on take off from a stop and its not really noticeable when shifting gears. I took it around a parking lot today in 1st gear practicing some turns and it really makes things difficult for me at slow speed turns. I was coasting around in gear with out using the clutch, gave it a little gas to push it through a slow fairly tight corner, the engine rev’d (still not clutching) but the power just wasn’t there when I expected it and then with a jerk it was there when I didn’t expect it. Also if I apply brake and gear down (or not) for a turn, then open it back up heading into the turn, same thing.

    I know for sure the idle is a little low. Bounces around 900 rpm at temp. I’m also going to check the drive chain soon. If anything it’s too tight. I don’t have a gauge so any measurements would also be appreciated TIA

    #2
    It is likely your cush drive rubbers have disintegrated. A very common issue on these bikes. There are some tutorials on this topic if you search.

    First check your chain. If the chain is OK, then you'll want to check if there is relative movement between the rear sprocket carrier and the wheel. If there is a lot, its because your cush drive is bad.

    Edit:
    I will add you will want to take care not to set your chain too tight in an effort to solve this problem. Loose is safer on a Hawk, because a chain that is too tight will cause your engine shaft (to front sprocket) spline to wear quickly, which is a major overhaul to fix.

    Last edited by riot; 07-25-2022, 06:27 PM.

    Comment


      #3
      Hmm I did pull on the chain to see if it had a lot of sag and it had very little. Makes me wonder if the previous owner attempted to solve the issue that way. I’ll have to figure out how to take the measurements to see if it is in fact too tight. Thanks riot!

      Comment


        #4
        This is how you do it right, and why. https://youtu.be/ZPI11B_f8mg
        Flock of Hawks | '13 Tacoma | '69 Falcon (currently getting reassembled!)
        I've spent most of my money on women, beer, cars and motorcycles. The rest of it I just wasted.

        Comment


          #5
          again with this vid...lol
          Gino
          Chain Roller

          NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE PREDICTABILITY OF STUPIDITY

          2012 CCS LRRS ULSB Champion
          2012 CCS LRRS P89 Champion
          2008 CCS ULSB National Champion
          LRRS HAWK GT Racer CCS Expert #929
          ECK RACING

          Comment


            #6
            Originally Posted by nt650hawk View Post
            again with this vid...lol
            You are famous dude. Better get used to it.

            o.p. I am suspecting rider error. I have seen a lot of new riders getting jerked around on their bikes from some of the following,..

            being to stiff on the bike,
            being in too low a gear,
            not being smooth on the throttle ,
            holding on too tight.

            some or all of these things can create a kind of feedback loop that can have you feel like you are describing.

            You could have bad cush rubbers, but I've ridden many bikes with bad rubbers (we all have), you can hear it, and feel it, but it doesn't quiet do what you are describing.
            A video would help.
            Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

            Comment


              #7
              I swear I drove in circles in front of my house for a few weeks before I was comfortable with the controls.
              6 is totally correct with his previous observations of new riders.

              being to stiff on the bike,
              being in too low a gear,
              not being smooth on the throttle ,
              holding on too tight
              Perfect description of me when I first got the Hawk.

              I laid out the DMV test with masking tape in the street and practiced it every day.
              After a little while my death grip on the bars decreased and that really helped control it better. Especially slower speed moves.

              Wouldn't hurt to check and lube your throttle cable. Could be an issue there but I am no pro.

              By the way blue masking tape will stay on the street for like 2 years.

              Comment


                #8
                As an MSF instructor, I tell my students to squeeze the tank with your knees like there is a $100 bill between your knee and the tank and you don't want to lose it. Relax your arms and grip, learn the friction point of the clutch and control the speed of the bike with it, if you do you can rev then engine to redline and the bike will stay at the speed you want. Clutch controls how fast the bike moves, throttle controls how fast the engine spins. You'll never learn slow speed control with the clutch all the way out and using just the throttle. You'll just get frustrated. Take the MSF course if you haven't, it's worth every penny. Then ride for a while and sign up for a track day. Also ride the back brake a little to help as well in slow speed manouvers.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally Posted by 6 View Post

                  You are famous dude. Better get used to it.

                  o.p. I am suspecting rider error. I have seen a lot of new riders getting jerked around on their bikes from some of the following,..

                  being to stiff on the bike,
                  being in too low a gear,
                  not being smooth on the throttle ,
                  holding on too tight.

                  some or all of these things can create a kind of feedback loop that can have you feel like you are describing.

                  You could have bad cush rubbers, but I've ridden many bikes with bad rubbers (we all have), you can hear it, and feel it, but it doesn't quiet do what you are describing.
                  A video would help.
                  I’m def guilty on a couple of those points. I checked last night and the chain is in spec per the manual. I’m aware that it’s a common opinion that it may need a little more sag than that. I can rotate my wheel quite a bit before the sprocket spins. If I had to guess it’s well over an inch of play. I’ll take a quick vid tonight and share in the am. Is there a point where you can’t just replace the rubbers and must replace the whole system ?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally Posted by Hawk22 View Post

                    I’m def guilty on a couple of those points. I checked last night and the chain is in spec per the manual. I’m aware that it’s a common opinion that it may need a little more sag than that. I can rotate my wheel quite a bit before the sprocket spins. If I had to guess it’s well over an inch of play. I’ll take a quick vid tonight and share in the am. Is there a point where you can’t just replace the rubbers and must replace the whole system ?
                    usually just the rubbers but some have destroyed the housing by riding hard with no dampers.
                    Brian - Richland, WA
                    1991 Hawk GT
                    1997 VFR

                    Comment


                      #11
                      learn about the clutch friction zone and how to use it to be smooth.
                      "It's only getting worse."


                      MY rides: '97 VFR750, '90 Red Hawk, '88 Blue/Black Hawk, '86 RWB VFR700 (3), '86 Yamaha Radian, '90 VTR250, '89 VTR250 (2), '73 CB125, '66 Yamaha YL-1

                      Sold: '86 FJ1200, '92 ZX-7, '90 Radian, '73 CB750, '89 all-white Hawk, '88 blue Hawk, '86 FZ600, '86 Yam Fazer 700 , '89 VTR250, '87 VFR700F2, '86 VFR700F.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Set your chain slack to the highest mark on the adjustment tool. The factory adjustment spec is simply not enough. Gino's video proves it. Just watch the chain go from 'about to fall off' to 'high E string' in a short sweep of the swingarm.

                        Check the cush rubbers. That's a 10 second investment in rime. Our video section also has a video for checking cush wear with everything assembled, the bike on the ground, no stands required.

                        Adjust the idle. It's supposed to be something like 1200 +/- 50 RPM. 900 is a bit low.

                        And the best 2 pieces of advice are to ride the rear brake during low speed maneuvers and drag the clutch to let the engine spin up to a usable power level AND to dampen the application of that power.

                        If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

                        The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Well I can’t seem to upload from my phone for some reason. The rubbers are def gone. I can rotate the sprocket independently from the wheel and it makes a hard clank when it does catch. I will work on my driving technique. I’ve drove a stick daily for over 15 yrs so I’m pretty familiar with clutch friction points. While not quite the same I have no doubt that I should adapt quickly. I will also take advantage of the rear brake. Getting the bike ready for new Cush rubbers this weekend and next will be doing some carb work in an attempt to straighten out the idle. Thanks for all the advice

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally Posted by Hawk22 View Post
                            Well I can’t seem to upload from my phone for some reason. The rubbers are def gone. I can rotate the sprocket independently from the wheel and it makes a hard clank when it does catch. I will work on my driving technique. I’ve drove a stick daily for over 15 yrs so I’m pretty familiar with clutch friction points. While not quite the same I have no doubt that I should adapt quickly. I will also take advantage of the rear brake. Getting the bike ready for new Cush rubbers this weekend and next will be doing some carb work in an attempt to straighten out the idle. Thanks for all the advice
                            Car = get off the clutch asap to avoid burning it up. Bike = ride that clutch all the time at low speeds in the friction point as it's oil bathed and you won't hurt it. But a lot of your issue sounds like the cush rubber.

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