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Sept BOTM: "Soichiro's Pride" = Non-Hawk Hondas

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    #16
    Originally Posted by nozzle View Post
    fourth generation VFR would have to be that white for me, it looks so nice... I may even put up with white wheels on that bike.
    Also not a fan of white wheels! LOVE my gen 4 but it's nowhere near as pretty as these, the ratty plastics hide an extremely well maintained and mechanically sound VFR.
    88 Hawk GT

    Talk big. Think small. Do nothing.

    Comment


      #17
      I bought this clean 2006 Honda 919 (Hornet 900) in the summer, and it just exudes "Hondaness". Reputedly, it was a parts bin bike designed to compete with the Ducati monster in the naked sports bike class, but Honda engineers couldn't bear producing anything so uncivilized. So they beefed up the Hornet 600 chassis, and detuned a Fireblade engine to produce more torque and about a hundred horsepower. They claimed a 428 lb dry weight (ha!) but even with five gallons of gas, it just feels like a larger Hawk GT when you sit on it. Low, good ergonomics. In typical Honda fashion, everything is carefully designed, coordinated, and nicely finished.

      Yes, yes, I know. Nearly all these bikes have been modified and thrashed. But as a stock ride, it seems like a modern 1973 CB750 to me. Quiet, fast, reliable. Goes, stops, handles well. And in this state of tune, Honda reliable and almost unbreakable. Some of the guys on wristtwisters.com insist they have not adjusted the valves in 30,000 miles. And did I mention, that like the CB77 Hawk, there are no front down tubes and the engine is a stressed member?

      Unfortunately, like the Hawk GT, they did not sell well in the United States, but have a following around the world. Somehow, it is so perfectly "Honda" that it lacks personality. And yeah, the weirdest part is, because of Japanese production commitments, these bikes were manufactured by Honda Italy. Ciao!

      Honda 919 RF MED.jpg

      Comment


        #18
        Posted this under VFR pics a while back:IMG_1316.JPGIMG_1321.JPGIMG_1320.JPGIMG_1314.JPG

        Comment


          #19
          And here's the write up:
          Thought you guy like to see my 86 VFR700. I prefer the pearl white to the red/white/blue. I've had it since 1990. 96,000+ miles. Bunch of mods. I've been a machinist for 35+ years and have full access to a shop. And our welder is a wizard with a TIG torch. Nice perks. See if you can find the mods.

          Ok guys, since you're all curious, here's the skinny: I bought the bike in 1990 with 11,000 miles on it. I had a 500 interceptor but I started riding with guys on 750's and 900's. They all had radar detectors. I could keep up in the mountains but I was afraid I was gonna blow up the poor little 500 up riding it WFO all the time. Had to get a faster sled. Had to be a V4. Had to be a VFR. Oh yeah! Had it ever since. I've been a machinist for over 30 years and have full access at our shop to the equipment (nice perk) so all the mods were done by me over the years. Our welder (a wizard with a TIG torch) likes my home projects and does my welding for me "pro bono". Back in the 80's the VFR was Honda's baddest sled. 3 straight Superbike titles: Fred Merkel,86; Wayne Rainey,87; Bubba Shobert,88. What would you like to know about the first gen VFR? "I have detailed files" (I also have printouts, with prices, from the late 80's of the HRC kit stuff for the VFR)

          MY mods:

          Front fork legs: The fork legs are indeed from a mid 90's CB1000 'Big One'. 43mm tubes with a 'proper', modern, cartridge damper inside and only 5mm shorter the VFR forks (perfect sihce I had my stock forks pulled up 5mm in their clamps). Flip style axle clamp on the bottom of the sliders just like the RC30's (and also the HRC kit fork). No external adjusters (after juggling oil weights I found the std. damping rates close to perfect) Std. CB1000 springs, with new spacers to reduce preload from 32mm to 10mm (again, just about perfect for the 95 lb. lighter VFR). RC30 fork legs are also 43mm, "right side up" but are indeed too short for a VFR (also very rare). The HRC race kit forks were 43mm, multi-external adjustable, with magnesium lower sliders (ULTRA rare, probably only10-12 sets ever made it to the states) The mag. forks were also used on the RVF750 endurance racers and Mike Velasco was able to snag a set of those for the original 2 Bros. race Hawk.

          Triple clamps: Again, CB1000 Big One, with modified stops, and my VFR's stem (different length) pressed in there. 40mm off-set, same as the VFR. Lucked out on that one so I didn't have to carve a new set out of billet.

          Front fender: CBR600 F4, heated with a heat gun and squished in 8mm to fit the CB1000 fork. Painted pearl white to match my sled. The CB1000 fender was ugly. Custom, carved from billet mounts to fit the fender to the fork sliders. RC30, CB1000, and HRC kit forks use that quick release axle clamp and have no lugs for fender mounting. The mounts are held on with circlips. This set-up allows you to drop the clamps, then drop the wheel and rotors out of the calipers, swivel the sliders to get the calipers out of the wheel, and off comes the wheel. Quick change, developed for the RVF endurance racers. The RC30, CB1000, and HRC forks were the only Honda's to ever use this set-up. Very trick. I painted my sliders a kind of 'gun metal' color to match the uber trick mag. forks on Wayne and Bubba's forks.

          Front wheel: Correct guess on the CBR600 F3. Exactly 1 pound lighter but dimensionally identical to a 94-97 VFR wheel. Painted white, no speedo drive. 3.5 pounds lighter (w/the 310 mm rotors) than my previous F2/stock (276mm) rotor set-up.

          Speedo drive: 90-93 front sprocket cover (direct bolt on) with it's speedo gearbox. It sticks out .520" further so I used the 90-93 clutch push rod ( just 'happened' to be .520" longer) and made a new drive coupling to reach the sprocket nut.

          Brake rotors: 1998-99 CBR900RR, 310mm, with a new hole pattern and carved from bar stock adapter ring to mate them to the F3 wheel (mounting faces were machined for rotor/caliper spacing.

          Calipers and M.Cyl.: VT1000 Superhawk. I used my brake lines.

          Handlebars: Carved from billet to clamp on those 43mm tubes, above the top clamp, and maintain the Stock riding position which I prefer.

          With this front end set-up you're about as close as you can get to the HRC superbikes and it looks pretty much like Wayne and Bubba's bikes. Period correct, quick change, 43mm fork, 6 spoke Honda wheel (3.5"x17") and big 310mm rotors with 4 piston calipers. Finding an HRC mag. kit fork and mag-tek wheel,,, One can only dream... I waited years to do the fork swap. F2 fork? 2 inches too short (wreaks the geometry) and "only" 41mm. Later VFR fork? Again, only 41mm and the length??? Not worth the big hassle. Modern upside down fork? Wouldn't look right, no real functional advantage on the old VFR, and all are way too short. When I saw the "Big One" fork I thought; "that's worth the hassle and the only thing I want. Surely it'll be long enough off that tall CB". Took me several years of looking to source one. Was it worth the hassle? Absolutely! Gone is the flex and 'iffy' damping from the 37 mm, damper rod fork. And nice, big, 310mm brakes. And the look? See for yourselves.

          Rear wheel: CBR600F2, 4.5"x17", rotor, and sprocket (43t) The 43t sprocket, 2 teeth smaller than the VFR's 45, equals the same overall gearing/Rpm/Mph when going from the VFR's 18" wheel/tire to the F2's 17"er. The F2 sprocket carrier had 5mm machined off it to align the chain run while keeping the wheel centered in the chassis. A 160/60x17 clears the chain by about 3/8" and is really all the tire my 85-90 hp. VFR needs.

          Rear brake: F2 caliper with it's hanger, highly modified, to align the brake and use the VFR's brake torque arm. The stock VFR arm was too long. I machined a new, shorter, one out of bar stock. The F2's single caliper piston was only 12-15% different in area than the VFR's 2 piston one. Close enough for the stock VFR master cyl.

          Rear shock: Fox Twin Clicker, adjustable for length, adjusted to account for the smaller, 17" F2, rear wheel. It works real well. Nuff said.

          Exhaust: Stock, stainless head tubes with custom (by me) 4-2-1 collector in .049" wall (same as stock), 304 stainless (u-bends from Burns Stainless). Made with "merge" collectors and dimensioned, as close as I could deduce from pictures, to mimic the HRC kit exhaust and maintain equal lengths. It's re-routed to clear the stock centerstand (an optional part back in the day, right on Honda's parts fiche. Now "no longer available", rarer than hen's teeth, and highly sought after). The muffler is from a Yoshimura CBR600F2 race system (salvage yard). The strap is custom in Titanium CP2 and the hanger is machined from 6061 and uses the stock rubber sleeve at the mount. The whole set-up weighs 7 pounds. The stock duals were 16.5 lbs. (not too bad for a stock system). That's a 9 lb. weight loss. It gave a noticeable bump in the power across the range with no flat spots. My "butt dyno" estimate is about 6-8 hp. Sounds really good too.

          The motor is stock. Spark plugs, valve adj's, and fluid changes (oil every 3-4000) is all I've done to it over the years. It still uses no oil and runs perfect. The whole bike weigh 471 lbs. with 1.5 gals. of gas on the certified scale at our shop.

          Comment


            #20
            Why the VFR?
            The 86 VFR was the first Honda street bike to feature an aluminum frame. It also had those sweet gear driven cams in that wonderful V4 motor. The Race versions went on to win 3 straight (every year Honda competed) AMA superbike titles with Merkel, Rainey, and Shobert. It was Honda's technical masterpiece of the 80's. All the detail pieces are nice aluminum forgings. And dead reliable. It set a 24 hour speed record with, I think it was, Cycle World magazine and set the fastest lap time in their superbike shootout in 1986 (yes, even faster than the GSXR1100. I still have the magazine with the article.
            Want more....? "I have detailed files"

            Comment


              #21
              Originally Posted by doogee57 View Post
              Posted this under VFR pics a while back:IMG_1316.JPGIMG_1321.JPGIMG_1320.JPGIMG_1314.JPG
              this.

              Pearl White.

              the nicest pearl white I've come across. thanks for sharing

              Comment


                #22
                nozzle enter your blackbird, let's get a 6-way going.
                Suzondacati Build Thread

                Chain rollers, swing arm chain guides, brake hangers, etc.

                Various parts for sale

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally Posted by frinesi2 View Post
                  nozzle enter your blackbird, let's get a 6-way going.
                  I was looking at pictures and am much more attached to my 25th Anniversary. RWB 6th gen VFR just due to the miles I've put on her... I can speak from personal experience about riding it across the country with my son... but as far as VFRs go, that 5th gen is my fav. Maybe I'll have to do both for comparison...

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Pearl White.

                    Yeah, I prefer the pearl white. Back in 1989/90 I passed over several RWB ones, even full 750's. To me, the RWB ones looked too much like all the other sport bikes back in "the day".

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Here is my entry, all pictures from today after it got a huge service and new paintwork.
                      2003 Honda ST1300

                      Bike was so good Honda never updated it or made another one. Silky smooth V4 with a 360 degree crank, loads of torque from down low, all day comfort and handles way better than you would think.

                      This is kind of the last of the great Honda's, early 2000's I think is when they really started to change with the old guard retiring and the changing economy cutting down the number of new and exceptional models...sometimes I really think 2000 was it...the RC51 and XR650R, they never made anything as special or "Honda" after that.









                      [ATTACH=CONFIG]temp_18597_1411593969280_766[/ATTACH]

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally Posted by nozzle View Post

                        this.

                        Pearl White.

                        the nicest pearl white I've come across. thanks for sharing
                        Exactly like my VFR I bought off the showroom floor
                        "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally Posted by ricksax View Post
                          I bought this clean 2006 Honda 919 (Hornet 900) in the summer, and it just exudes "Hondaness". Reputedly, it was a parts bin bike designed to compete with the Ducati monster in the naked sports bike class, but Honda engineers couldn't bear producing anything so uncivilized. So they beefed up the Hornet 600 chassis, and detuned a Fireblade engine to produce more torque and about a hundred horsepower. They claimed a 428 lb dry weight (ha!) but even with five gallons of gas, it just feels like a larger Hawk GT when you sit on it. Low, good ergonomics. In typical Honda fashion, everything is carefully designed, coordinated, and nicely finished.

                          Yes, yes, I know. Nearly all these bikes have been modified and thrashed. But as a stock ride, it seems like a modern 1973 CB750 to me. Quiet, fast, reliable. Goes, stops, handles well. And in this state of tune, Honda reliable and almost unbreakable. Some of the guys on wristtwisters.com insist they have not adjusted the valves in 30,000 miles. And did I mention, that like the CB77 Hawk, there are no front down tubes and the engine is a stressed member?

                          Unfortunately, like the Hawk GT, they did not sell well in the United States, but have a following around the world. Somehow, it is so perfectly "Honda" that it lacks personality. And yeah, the weirdest part is, because of Japanese production commitments, these bikes were manufactured by Honda Italy. Ciao!

                          Honda 919 RF MED.jpg
                          Nearly bought one of these in 09, the Honda dealer in Menomonie had a holdover that he had a 5000.00 ticket on...a red one just like yours.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            YooperJon But you went fishing instead ?

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally Posted by nozzle View Post
                              YooperJon But you went fishing instead ?
                              True.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                But then I bought a 599 and was deeply disappointed in it. Hornet 2.jpg

                                Comment

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