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    Wont Start

    I'm trying to get this thing to start but no luck yet. I took all of the wiring loose and fuel tubes loose in order to remove the subframe. I put it back together, and I cannot get it to start. Its turning over but not catching at all. So far I have sucked gas to get it through the lines, blown air into the tank with a shop vac (yes I made sure it was clean), and looked to make sure everything is connected. I pulled the spark plugs, they look fine. I do not have a voltage tester, so I'm not sure if it's and electrical problem. I also tried to short the fuel pump relay as specified in 18-9, but this didn't seem to do anything. Anyone have a suggestion.
    I'm new to working on bikes so, I'm a little lost on some of this stuff. I did notice with all of the effort to get fuel through the lines, nothing is flowing through them after the fuel pump when I'm trying to start it (I can suck it through though). I also bypassed the fuel pump by connecting the fuel line after the pump directly to the pep valve. One more question, where does the larger gauge green wire, next to the battery tray go? It looks like a grounding wire, but I can't remember where I pulled it from. Thanks

    Chris

    #2
    wont start

    your right thats a earth lead,it's on the right side of the subframe near the battery box you should see a mounting for a small bolt,once you connect the wire there it should start hope this helps

    flypiguk

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      #3
      wont start

      just had a look at the sub,if you look at where the brake res is bolted to next to it is the bolt hole you are looking for

      flypiguk

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        #4
        Does it mount to the brake res. bolt or in another spot next to the brake res. I have it mounted to the brake res. bolt. Would this keep it from starting (possibly not a strong enough ground)?

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          #5
          wont start

          next to the brake res theres a bolt hole thats the earth point?..has to be fixed to the frame for a good earth also give the earth strap a good clean

          flypiguk

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            #6
            Also I would check if you have spark, pull the plug put it back into the boot cap, use a pair of vice grips to hold it and let it touch the engine somewhere, do not hold it as the risk of voltage shock is too great, at least IMO, turn the bike over and you will see a spark between electrodes of the plug, if there isn't any it IS electrical...
            Damn right it's a Hawk GT

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              #7
              It's a bit of an aside, but a tip for anything to do with wiring.

              Be very wary if any wiring mods have been done (maybe that you aren't aware of even) prior, about the colours of wire that might have been used (nb. as well as wire diameters that may not be suitable).

              I had an absolute nightmare sorting out the wiring on an Aprilia RST, that a dealership had totally messed up the rectifier wiring mod on. They'd only done half of it (the easy, less essential part), BUT, they'd used GREEN wire for the positive side to the fuse box (discovery of which was an eventual 'well just what the heck has been done with that? peel it off and trace it back' moment, which revealed the green inners that had been hidden before), and the idiots had then connected the GREEN wires at the rectifier end, to the other GREEN wires that were the rectifier EARTH output.

              The whole point of the particular mod is to massively beef up the amperage handling of the rectifier dump to earth, and cleaning up/beefing up the positive feed to the fusebox is just something to do 'while you are at it'. Otherwise there's a whole lot of energy with nowhere to go, which just burns out rectifiers, makes cables and connectors glow, and turns them brittle and increases their resistance, which just further compounds the problem.

              Think of it like plumbing. If you need to get 10 gallons a second from point A to point B, with 1" pipe, the pressures and connections are designed accordingly. Drop the size to 1/2" pipe, and pressures go up dramatically in order to achieve that 10 gallons a second, and stresses on the system climb, especially at every connection. Increase the size to 2" pipe, and pressures drop dramatically, therefore reducing the stresses on the system. So always use bigger diameter wire rather than smaller, and if you up the diameter of the feed, then up the diameter of the return as well, as well as having as few 'stress points' (connections) in the system as possible.

              If doing any work with wiring, sort out your live cables from your earth cables as you go, have suitable coloured wire of decent diameter for any additions, and even use a little coloured tape for marker tabs or coloured shrink wrap at each connection, so you can instantly see what is what on reconnection, as well as if you or anyone else ever have to do any more wiring work at another time.

              I know wiring is a royal PITA (I hate doing the stuff), but it does have the benefit of at least being logical (especially with a good wiring diagram).

              Good luck getting things running, and hopefully the aside is some use to you.

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