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    Clutch Replacement

    Well, the clutch on my Hawk is getting worse. It used to only slip a little when downshifting agressively from 5th to 4th to pass, now it's giving a little when I get on it in 2nd. Good thing I ride it around town like a grandpa the majority of the time. So, parts...

    Stock OEM clutch plates? aftermarket?
    replace the springs? or shim them as was mentioned before?

    Is there a side cover gasket that needs to be replaced after it's removed? Or it is O-ring'd?

    This Hawk is going to stay close to stock motorwise for the forseeable future. Pods,jetted,exhaust.

    Also keep in mind I'm on a broke college budget right now, the cheaper the better until June. I just need to keep it running to get to class.
    Tim
    '89 HawkGT - Dirty
    '07 S3 - WHEEEEE!

    #2
    I used "stock" plates and steels. I say "stock" as in aftermarket "like stock" not performance and not OEM Honda. I could have reused my steels as they looked very good, but I went with new. After 46K miles (I'm original owner) it was due.

    I also went with stock springs instead of stronger springs. I have the same setup and am very happy with the performance now!!

    Oh, yes you may need a gasket for the cover. I't POSSIBLE to reuse it, but I didn't try.
    Mark
    88 HawkGT (original owner)
    99 Concours
    02 VFR800

    Comment


      #3
      Tusk... are you saying that you got 46,000 miles out of the original clutch??? You must baby the hell out of that bike.
      If so, what have you replaced in 46k?[/i]
      '89 NT650 Hawk GT
      '91 CR125
      '99 KX250
      '97 S-10 (AKA Bike Hauler)

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        #4
        Clutch replacement

        Whatever way you go, be careful dis-assembling the clutch, if you are replacing the plates. The inner basket has four aluminum 'towers' inside the springs that are held still, while loosening the central nut. I found out the hard way they break off pretty easy. ops: I had a spare engine for parts, so I was way lucky. The manual suggests the special Honda tool, (of course) but the tool can be made fairly easily. Its just important to hold on to all four towers at once to spread the torque around.
        -I'm sorry....I did not know she was your sister.
        -If Buckleys cold mixture went rancid......how would anybody know????
        -Dont piss off the quiet guy with the chain saw.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally Posted by Vtwin650
          Tusk... are you saying that you got 46,000 miles out of the original clutch??? You must baby the hell out of that bike.
          If so, what have you replaced in 46k?
          Well, I also went about 20+K before doing the valves! ops: But yeah, I'm very careful. Mostly commuting, some highway miles (including two Hawk Rallys in NC) and one and two up rides.

          Replacement-wise, I just did the sprockets last year (from originals). I have had 2 other chains prior. The rear shock was sacked after about 25K and the fork springs were changed after about 15K (progressives front and back). Tires and brakes..... That's it outside of some safety replacements (i.e. steel braided lines...).

          Now I'm itching to send the mill to Hord. Not sure though. I should probably invest that cash (which I don't have) in a better rear shock....

          edit: I'm a liar that's not it: I had to replace the thermostat last green water change.
          Mark
          88 HawkGT (original owner)
          99 Concours
          02 VFR800

          Comment


            #6
            Any more words of advise on this project? I've built my track car from the ground up, but never been inside a motorcycle other than just mainenance.

            Parts are enroute via Hord.
            Tim
            '89 HawkGT - Dirty
            '07 S3 - WHEEEEE!

            Comment


              #7
              I am about to change my clutch... Geno basically did it once for me when he put the shift kit in.

              I would like to get the special tool but I am told you can just "jam a rag in there"

              Yes you need a NEW gasket.

              Inspect your basket for wear and torque stuff to the right specs.

              I am not too intimidated so if oyu have some mechanical ability I bet it wouldn't take more than the afternoon.

              Now I am out the the Garage to pull the cover off and read my manual.
              BIKES: Honda: RC31 Racebike/ CRF 110 Mini Motard, DUCATI: 748
              Former MSF Rider Coach / Trackday Instructor/ Expert Roadracer #116
              "I'd rather ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow."

              Comment


                #8
                Nice and straight forward repair. I think the longest time was running to the store for a 27mm/ 1 1/16" socket for the large nut. Couple hours total tops.
                Tim
                '89 HawkGT - Dirty
                '07 S3 - WHEEEEE!

                Comment


                  #9
                  What signs do clutches show when they need replacement? Mine can be difficult to shift when its cold (like 27 F) and it hasn't warmed up. There's also a constant ticking (the valves are lightly ticking but this is a louder tick from the clutch area). Plus the whine I have described in another post ( http://www.hawkgtforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=1185 ).

                  Time to replace the clutch plates? Am I going to permenantly damage anything if I ride 300 mi to the beach and back this weekend with the symptoms described?

                  Thanks guys, information rules!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Somethin' about the procedure that you might get carried away with: it's a whole bunch easier to crack the side cover than you ever might think.It doesn't call for or need gorilla torque.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      If you don't have a clutch basket wrench you can make one by welding a old screw driver to an old steel clutch plate. The easiest way to remove the center nut however is to simply burp it off with an impact gun. Also if you lay the bike on its side you don't have to drain you oil. Remember to bed in the new clutch.
                      Faster than your mother... She's what the pros use.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        what do you mean "Bed in the new clutch"?
                        -NEVER LET YOUR FEARS STAND IN THE WAY OF YOUR DREAMS-
                        Most of the pics I have of my Hawk/Mods: http://gallery.me.com/stevenhowell

                        "Arseing about with my bikes will end in tears." -Keno04

                        "Dress for the slide, not the ride" - ParcNHawk

                        Comment


                          #13
                          what do you mean "Bed in the new clutch"?
                          You know, take it to dinner, tell it some compliments, get it drunk, then...

                          Sorry I couldn't resist.
                          -God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to hide the bodies of the people I had to kill because they annoyed me.

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