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    New brake line, no brake...


    So I installed the new front stainless brake line and proceeded to try to bleed up a firm lever. Ahh, no go.

    The new fluid made its way to the caliper quickly, had some bubbles as usual, figured I was near a new brake but not so much.

    Should I be seeing bubbles IN the master reservoir when pumping..? And if I should does that mean I had a different issue like the master just not pumping or other...?

    I did this to myself, the brake worked fin prior to this new line. Great huh...?

    Thanks,
    Rob

    U8ukUY.jpg




    Just ride it...

    2013 FLHTC, A Bunch of Guzzis...'88 Hawk GT, '89 Transalp, '99 SV 650, '84 RZ 350 KR, '72 Triumph T100 R, '71 Dalesman Trials etc...

    #2
    Look up gravity feed brake bleeding on youtube or elsewhere. Very easy with simple direct short distance of a bike. I do it with all my vehicles 2 wheels and 4.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally Posted by Ssnead View Post
      Look up gravity feed brake bleeding on youtube or elsewhere. Very easy with simple direct short distance of a bike. I do it with all my vehicles 2 wheels and 4.
      Yeah, I probably should have hung the caliper before coming in for the night.

      Good thought, thanks.
      Just ride it...

      2013 FLHTC, A Bunch of Guzzis...'88 Hawk GT, '89 Transalp, '99 SV 650, '84 RZ 350 KR, '72 Triumph T100 R, '71 Dalesman Trials etc...

      Comment


        #4
        I actually spoke too soon... I had heard of a method of hanging the caliper above the master and pumping to clear the air bubbles.

        I did go YouTube the gravity method and tried the zip tie the lever to the bar over night trick. I'll know in the AM. If not then the simple gravity feed and wait a few more minutes.

        Thanks,
        rad

        Just ride it...

        2013 FLHTC, A Bunch of Guzzis...'88 Hawk GT, '89 Transalp, '99 SV 650, '84 RZ 350 KR, '72 Triumph T100 R, '71 Dalesman Trials etc...

        Comment


          #5
          usually you'd need to bleed the mc at the banjo bolt first thing.
          "It's only getting worse."


          MY rides: '97 VFR750, '90 Red Hawk, '88 Blue/Black Hawk, '86 RWB VFR700 (3), '86 Yamaha Radian, '90 VTR250, '89 VTR250 (2), '73 CB125, '66 Yamaha YL-1

          Sold: '86 FJ1200, '92 ZX-7, '90 Radian, '73 CB750, '89 all-white Hawk, '88 blue Hawk, '86 FZ600, '86 Yam Fazer 700 , '89 VTR250, '87 VFR700F2, '86 VFR700F.

          Comment


            #6
            I prefer to fill from the caliper pushing fluid up to the MC. From there, I start by holding lever pressure and cracking open the banjo bolt at the MC. Air bubbles love to hang out up high by the MC so bleeding from the MC to start helps. A bolt with a bkeeder makes things even easier.
            ASMA #139

            Comment


              #7

              I tried the bleed at the M/C banjo, which I had never done before and it seems as if that and a combination of gravity feed, I am getting a firm lever. Not perfect yet so I will pump some more new Dot 4 through it when I get back from some errands.
              I have a good feeling about the results.

              This is not my first brake job and bleeding session but it has been a learning experience, appreciate the input.

              Thanks,
              rad__
              Just ride it...

              2013 FLHTC, A Bunch of Guzzis...'88 Hawk GT, '89 Transalp, '99 SV 650, '84 RZ 350 KR, '72 Triumph T100 R, '71 Dalesman Trials etc...

              Comment


                #8
                Originally Posted by radhawk View Post
                I tried the bleed at the M/C banjo, which I had never done before and it seems as if that and a combination of gravity feed, I am getting a firm lever. Not perfect yet so I will pump some more new Dot 4 through it when I get back from some errands.
                I have a good feeling about the results.

                This is not my first brake job and bleeding session but it has been a learning experience, appreciate the input.

                Thanks,
                rad__
                Did you bleed at both banjos?

                There can never be enough places to bleed from.

                I usually start at the top and work my way down. Bleed at the line at the Mc, then the line at the caliper, then the caliper bleed nipple.

                If you are dealing with something with a block or a split to dual lines there somewhere, I'll bleed there too.

                Holding the lever in and letting it "thwap" it self open a few good times can seem to help shake some air loose once you have a decent lever as can tapping the calipers with a mallet.



                ​​​​​
                Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Yes, you should get some bubbles at the MC. Totally normal. That's just the air that worked up the line escaping through the reservoir.

                  Are there any loops that could trap air? Did you title the master so any air would go out the reservoir? Did you tilt the caliper around to make sure no air got trapped before the bleed screw?

                  Never really had any issues bleeding by filling the reservoir and sucking it down from the caliper with a mityvac hand pump.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    So in the AM I did the simple gravity feed with the bleeder nipple open plus bleeding at the banjos. Close the system back up and low and behold I started to feel a firm lever so I kept going and completely changed the fluid, give or take with new/fresh, Dot 4.

                    I am actually fairly satisfied with it the way it is, good travel and distance from the bar but I will know better tomorrow with a test ride. Hoping that the feedback is there and not wooden.

                    This really had me feeing like an amateur and I have always enjoyed doing brakes, rebuilding calipers, masters etc. and bleeding... Guzzis and recently Triumphs mostly but still, a brake system.

                    I even thought I would go buy one of the pump type bleeders on the market but luckily did not go that route.

                    Thanks all,

                    rad__
                    Just ride it...

                    2013 FLHTC, A Bunch of Guzzis...'88 Hawk GT, '89 Transalp, '99 SV 650, '84 RZ 350 KR, '72 Triumph T100 R, '71 Dalesman Trials etc...

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally Posted by radhawk View Post
                      So in the AM I did the simple gravity feed with the bleeder nipple open plus bleeding at the banjos. Close the system back up and low and behold I started to feel a firm lever so I kept going and completely changed the fluid, give or take with new/fresh, Dot 4.

                      I am actually fairly satisfied with it the way it is, good travel and distance from the bar but I will know better tomorrow with a test ride. Hoping that the feedback is there and not wooden.

                      This really had me feeing like an amateur and I have always enjoyed doing brakes, rebuilding calipers, masters etc. and bleeding... Guzzis and recently Triumphs mostly but still, a brake system.

                      I even thought I would go buy one of the pump type bleeders on the market but luckily did not go that route.

                      Thanks all,

                      rad__
                      I really don't like those pump bleeders. I prefer the old fashioned way.

                      You won't end up with a wooden feel from a braided line on a stock setup. It should feel just fine. If there is still air it may feel soft, none it should feel good. As long as you didn't jump to a big master then the feel should only improve.

                      Ok. I checked ours.

                      The many variables aside. The Daisy Hawk has the same brake setup.

                      A good firm squeeze, about as hard as I ever pull when getting sporty on it, leaves me 20mm lever to grip.

                      I'm a pretty strong dude, If I give it everything I have I can not pull that lever to the bar as hard as I can squeeze one handed.

                      We may have different levers, different grips, different rotor thickness, and not to mention strength or idea of a firm pull... . But just as an idea.
                      Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally Posted by 6 View Post

                        I really don't like those pump bleeders. I prefer the old fashioned way.

                        =========

                        A good firm squeeze, about as hard as I ever pull when getting sporty on it, leaves me 20mm lever to grip.


                        Yeah, I had a pump thingy years ago but never did do well with it... not sure why. I do not mind do it the old fashioned way.

                        And awesome that you measure or just know the distance to the bar, I was just thinking the same thing yesterday. I ran around the garage checking all the cycles here, none of which are Hawks.
                        This one stops at about 25 -22mm depending on how hard I pull, your basic stock Hawk dogleg lever.

                        Thanks 6, good info.
                        Rob





                        Just ride it...

                        2013 FLHTC, A Bunch of Guzzis...'88 Hawk GT, '89 Transalp, '99 SV 650, '84 RZ 350 KR, '72 Triumph T100 R, '71 Dalesman Trials etc...

                        Comment

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