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Crankcase bolts all came off but crankcase cover is still sticking to something...

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    Crankcase bolts all came off but crankcase cover is still sticking to something...

    I'm a little perplexed; I'm opening up the crankcase (left cover) to inspect the stator for burnt coils (two different regulator / rectifiers have failed on longer highway trips on hot days).

    I've followed the service manual:

    - Disconnect the alternator 3P connector (WHITE)
    - Remove the gearshift arm pinch bolt and shiftarm from the spindle.
    - Remove the drive sprocket cover.
    - Place a container under the left crankcase cover to catch the engine oil.
    - Remove the eleven left crankcase cover bolts

    The manual now says to remove the crankcase cover, but something is causing it to stick to the crankcase.

    I went around and tapped on the cover gently with a rubber mallet, thinking that the gasket was causing it to stick, but now there's a visible 3mm gap between the crankcase cover and the crankcase and some play and it still won't come off.

    Maybe 1/4 cup of oil has drained out so far.

    I am tempted to drive a wedge between the cover and the crankcase, but thought I'd ask here in case there's something obvious I'm missing.
    Last edited by bert; 07-08-2021, 11:52 PM. Reason: (specifiy left crankcase cover)

    #2



    If you're talking about the right cover, there is a little lip behind where the clutch cable bracket mounts that you can use to apply a little prying pressure. That worked for me anyway.


    honda-nt650-hawk-gt-1991-m-california-right-crankcase-cover_bighu0289e0600a_45f4.gif

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      #3
      Left crankcase cover, but I did apply some pressure to a similar lip on the left side, using the frame for leverage, and I felt like I was about to damage the cover since the aluminum is so pliable.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally Posted by bert View Post
        Left crankcase cover, but I did apply some pressure to a similar lip on the left side, using the frame for leverage, and I felt like I was about to damage the cover since the aluminum is so pliable.
        Got it - sorry I was of so little help...

        No doubt someone much will be along before too long to give you the right answer.

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          #5
          I appreciate it, I think it was good advice.

          Possible that the gasket is still the sticky thing and I'm just not seeing where it's adhering to the crankcase.

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            #6
            It might me hanging up on the dowels (#11). The dowels sometimes stick in the cover or the case. Rocking the cover back and forth has worked for me when that's happened.
            ASMA #139

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              #7
              If it's the left cover, wouldn't it be held on by the flywheel magnets grabbing on to the stator?
              Try pulling the cover evenly straight off the engine case and watch your finger tips when it snaps back.

              Comment


                #8
                I think I’ve used a box-cutter or razor blade to cut through the sticking gasket to free it up.
                Good luck!
                Bi-Coastal U.S.A.: Los Angeles, CA and Long Island, NY

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                  #9
                  Magnets and dowel pin, ding ding ding!

                  I used a smaller lever and (much) more force and it came off after some wiggling.

                  The old stator does look grungy and singed in places but to my untrained eye it’s not obvious whether it needs to be replaced.

                  I have a new one anyway and will give it a shot.
                  Attached Files

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                    #10
                    It could have actually been tested with the engine running.

                    If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

                    The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

                    Comment


                      #11
                      It doesn’t consistently misbehave The only time someone actually got it to show that it was running out of spec was early last fall, but then the problem mysteriously corrected itself and I rode the bike several thousand miles miles before the charging system cut out on the road the first time.

                      The first time the charging system stopped working on the road the mechanic looking at it saw a good reading on all three pins so we changed the regulator/rectifier and I made it a few thousand more miles before that r/r failed. This is why I suspect that something is not quite right with the stator.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally Posted by bert View Post
                        It doesn’t consistently misbehave The only time someone actually got it to show that it was running out of spec was early last fall, but then the problem mysteriously corrected itself and I rode the bike several thousand miles miles before the charging system cut out on the road the first time.

                        The first time the charging system stopped working on the road the mechanic looking at it saw a good reading on all three pins so we changed the regulator/rectifier and I made it a few thousand more miles before that r/r failed. This is why I suspect that something is not quite right with the stator.
                        Or the replacement R/R was of poor quality and is failing again. Some of the cheap replacements are not reliable.
                        Brian - Richland, WA
                        1991 Hawk GT
                        1997 VFR

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Hmm, that's fair. Replacement r/r number one was scrap from an Africa Twin; r/r number two was a Caltric $20 unit.

                          This is inspiring me to run through the diagnostics again before replacing anything.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            How good is the mechanic at electrical? Most I know hate it and aren't good at it because of that.

                            If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

                            The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

                            Comment


                              #15
                              You and your mechanic are probably testing that stator with a multi meter.
                              If it is obviously BAD that will work, BUT a multi meter is powered by a 9volt battery at best and doesn't REALLY have enough power to make it arc.
                              I test stators using 115volt/15amp AC house current. Cut the end off an extension cord and wire in a light bulb "pigtail" with a 40watt bulb, and use that to check continuity from leg to leg and from each leg to ground.
                              If you have continuity, the bulb lights up. If you have a ground fault you get smoke and sparks.
                              The lightbulb limits the current in the circuit, if it starts to pull REAL current the filament burns.

                              Even BETTER solution is take the stator to a alternator/starter rebuilder and he will have a HIGH VOLTAGE insulation tester and he will run 10,000 volts though it.
                              Have you checked the AC output of the stator with the bike running?

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