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    Idle Speed Screw Screw-Up

    Hi, I haven't been on this forum for a long time, but I'm hoping someone can help me. I'm getting ready to sell my Hawk, and I noticed that the idle rpms were just a little bit low (~1000). I had just started the bike. Stupidly, I adjusted the idle screw up, and the bike died. It hasn't started since, and I've moved the idle screw knob all over the place trying to find the right spot where it will start again. Does anybody know what the standard setting would be (like 2 full turns from totally in or something like that). I've been working on this every day for a week, and still can't get it to the place where it will start and idle. Everything else is fine because the bike was running perfectly. I just had to go and mess with the idle speed screw. Now I'm screwed.

    #2
    sounds like you are talking about 2 different things here. Were you adjusting the big screw with the plastic handle or the small screws that needs a screwdriver?
    Brian - Richland, WA
    1991 Hawk GT
    1997 VFR

    Comment


      #3
      Originally Posted by bk94si View Post
      sounds like you are talking about 2 different things here. Were you adjusting the big screw with the plastic handle or the small screws that needs a screwdriver?
      I'm talking about the big screw with the plastic handle.

      Comment


        #4
        initial setting on that adjustment should be about 1 to 1 1/2 turns in from the point where screw looses contact with the tab it presses on. too much or too little will make bike hard to start........as you discovered.
        "It's only getting worse."


        MY rides: '97 VFR750, '90 Red Hawk, '88 Blue/Black Hawk, '86 RWB VFR700 (3), '86 Yamaha Radian, '90 VTR250, '89 VTR250 (2), '73 CB125, '66 Yamaha YL-1

        Sold: '86 FJ1200, '92 ZX-7, '90 Radian, '73 CB750, '89 all-white Hawk, '88 blue Hawk, '86 FZ600, '86 Yam Fazer 700 , '89 VTR250, '87 VFR700F2, '86 VFR700F.

        Comment


          #5
          Thanks, Elite Hawker, I will try that setting. To be clear, you're saying take it all the way out (turning knob clockwise) until it loses contact with tab and then turn back 1-1/2 turns?

          Comment


            #6
            not exactly ! all the way out would be counterclockwse ( viewed from the bottom), doncha think ?
            "It's only getting worse."


            MY rides: '97 VFR750, '90 Red Hawk, '88 Blue/Black Hawk, '86 RWB VFR700 (3), '86 Yamaha Radian, '90 VTR250, '89 VTR250 (2), '73 CB125, '66 Yamaha YL-1

            Sold: '86 FJ1200, '92 ZX-7, '90 Radian, '73 CB750, '89 all-white Hawk, '88 blue Hawk, '86 FZ600, '86 Yam Fazer 700 , '89 VTR250, '87 VFR700F2, '86 VFR700F.

            Comment


              #7
              Oh, yes, viewed from the bottom. Thanks!

              Comment


                #8
                I wouldn't worry about how many turns, there is no set adjustment oin the number of turns. Just twist the throttle a little while starting the bike (no choke) and keep the idle higher and turn the screw until it holds the idle at the speed you are holding the throttle. Once you get it there you can let go of the throttle and back the screw off to a reasonable RPM, around 1000 to 800 depending on how warm it is. Once you let it idle and warm up some the engine speed should increase a little at which point you can turn it down a little more.
                88 Blue Hawk GT - Under construction but rideable (guest approved)
                89 BlackHawk 2.0 - On the lift and being assembled
                90 Hawk GT (color as to yet be determined) - Still on the shelf in crates

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally Posted by rpcraft View Post
                  I wouldn't worry about how many turns, there is no set adjustment oin the number of turns. Just twist the throttle a little while starting the bike (no choke) and keep the idle higher and turn the screw until it holds the idle at the speed you are holding the throttle. Once you get it there you can let go of the throttle and back the screw off to a reasonable RPM, around 1000 to 800 depending on how warm it is. Once you let it idle and warm up some the engine speed should increase a little at which point you can turn it down a little more.
                  Yes, but the problem is the bike doesn't start, so there is no idle to even adjust. I turn the screw, hit the start button, it doesn't start. I turn the ignition off, wait a little while, turn the screw a little more, doesn't start, etc.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Sounds like you problem is something other that the idle screw. You need to do some digging. Kill button got pushed, no spark, no fuel, etc.
                    Brian - Richland, WA
                    1991 Hawk GT
                    1997 VFR

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally Posted by squirrelman View Post
                      initial setting on that adjustment should be about 1 to 1 1/2 turns in from the point where screw looses contact with the tab it presses on. too much or too little will make bike hard to start........as you discovered.
                      I'm sorry to say that initial setting did not work.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Could be your battery is now too low to start the bike. Just because it turns over doesn't mean there is enough juice to start the bike,.
                        Brian - Richland, WA
                        1991 Hawk GT
                        1997 VFR

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally Posted by rpcraft View Post
                          I wouldn't worry about how many turns, there is no set adjustment oin the number of turns. Just twist the throttle a little while starting the bike (no choke) and keep the idle higher and turn the screw until it holds the idle at the speed you are holding the throttle. Once you get it there you can let go of the throttle and back the screw off to a reasonable RPM, around 1000 to 800 depending on how warm it is. Once you let it idle and warm up some the engine speed should increase a little at which point you can turn it down a little more.
                          much more useful than my attempt.
                          "It's only getting worse."


                          MY rides: '97 VFR750, '90 Red Hawk, '88 Blue/Black Hawk, '86 RWB VFR700 (3), '86 Yamaha Radian, '90 VTR250, '89 VTR250 (2), '73 CB125, '66 Yamaha YL-1

                          Sold: '86 FJ1200, '92 ZX-7, '90 Radian, '73 CB750, '89 all-white Hawk, '88 blue Hawk, '86 FZ600, '86 Yam Fazer 700 , '89 VTR250, '87 VFR700F2, '86 VFR700F.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Might just be a coincidence that something went bonkers as you turned down the idle screw but I would make sure that you charge the battery and/or put a booster on it. If you have been cranking a bit with a no start condition it very well could be a low battery issue. Once you get it charged and boosted engage the choke lever to give it as much chance as possible to fuel up the carb, and then while cranking twist the throttle some and hold it. Once you get it running for a few moments disengage the choke and hold the throttle by hand at an acceptable level
                            88 Blue Hawk GT - Under construction but rideable (guest approved)
                            89 BlackHawk 2.0 - On the lift and being assembled
                            90 Hawk GT (color as to yet be determined) - Still on the shelf in crates

                            Comment

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