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Any tips for rear brake bleed?

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    Any tips for rear brake bleed?

    I am getting ready to run a new stainless line through the swingarm and install a mini PSR resevoir. Does anybody have any tips they would like to share on bleeding or installing the brake line? I have seen some threads on the subject and a few people mention the small resevoir is hard to bleed. Just looking for any insights. First time bleeding brakes so any tips would be appreciated.

    #2
    Originally Posted by Smick6 View Post
    I am getting ready to run a new stainless line through the swingarm and install a mini PSR resevoir. Does anybody have any tips they would like to share on bleeding or installing the brake line? I have seen some threads on the subject and a few people mention the small resevoir is hard to bleed. Just looking for any insights. First time bleeding brakes so any tips would be appreciated.
    Bleed at every junction along the way, bleed where the line hooks to the master, then where the line hooks to the caliper, then the caliper.

    And keep the res full. Rear bleeds pretty easy.
    Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

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      #3
      You say first time so I don't want to assume anything. Crack open the bleeder, press pedal and hold down, close bleeder, release lever, repeat until all the air is gone. Also put a piece of tubing on the bleeder running into a container so you don't get brake fluid everywhere. And brake fluid does can eat paint so try to keep it off the wheel.
      Brian - Richland, WA
      1991 Hawk GT
      1997 VFR

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        #4
        you need to bleed and get pressure in the master cyl FIRST. it helpz and takes less time to fill dry lines with a syringe.
        "It's only getting worse."


        MY rides: '97 VFR750, '90 Red Hawk, '88 Blue/Black Hawk, '86 RWB VFR700 (3), '86 Yamaha Radian, '90 VTR250, '89 VTR250 (2), '73 CB125, '66 Yamaha YL-1

        Sold: '86 FJ1200, '92 ZX-7, '90 Radian, '73 CB750, '89 all-white Hawk, '88 blue Hawk, '86 FZ600, '86 Yam Fazer 700 , '89 VTR250, '87 VFR700F2, '86 VFR700F.

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          #5
          Push fluid in from the caliper to the MC. After that, press the pedal, crack the banjo bolt at the MC, tighten the banjo bolt and repeat until you get pedal pressure. Make sure to have plenty of rags around the banjo. From there it's the usual - pressure, bleed nipple open/close until no bubbles appear.
          ASMA #139

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            #6
            Thank you for the tips.

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              #7
              Figure out how you want your caliper and temporarily affix it and tighten all the banjos when you route your system. Then slide the caliper off, turn it right-side-up, insert something into it that's the width of your rotor, and then pump and bleed the system. I've got a bottom mounted caliper and I have to do this with even any brake flush I do. I could never get good pressure with the caliper upside down.

              Brake fluid is fantastic at stripping paint so lots of rags as others have said.
              Hawk with many differently shaped fuel tanks.

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                #8
                I use one of the air powered suction bleeders and it makes the job pretty easy. Not sure what access you have to a compressor but the unit is pretty affordable between the various HF, Northern tool, and various other store branded versions. It takes a little effort to keep the reservoir full but works well for me.

                https://www.harborfreight.com/brake-...der-92924.html
                88 Blue Hawk GT - Under construction but rideable (guest approved)
                89 BlackHawk 2.0 - On the lift and being assembled
                90 Hawk GT (color as to yet be determined) - Still on the shelf in crates

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                  #9
                  I refilled my rear caliper this morning after fitting new seals. Took out pads and fitted a wooden block to keep piston in place. Filled reservoir and waited until it stopped bubbling then refilled it.

                  Fitted a 20cm length of windscreen washer pipe to nipple put pipe into a bottle. Cracked the nipple 1/4 turn then left it for gravity to do it's thing while I got on with other stuff. Checked reservoir regularly topping up occasionally.

                  After an hour I gave the pedal a few bumps to shift the last bubbles then refitted pads. Pedal is rock hard.

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                    #10
                    Ditto - learn gravity feed, simple especially on bikes.

                    The trick I learned to get the last bubbles out of system is squeeze lever and use strong elastic/zip tie to maintain pressure over night. 2x4 on pedal works well with 4 wheel vehicles.

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                      #11
                      last of the bubbles - after you bleed the system and closed the bleed valve(s)...

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                        #12
                        There is another option too..

                        Save the weight and get that back brake out of there.
                        Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally Posted by 6 View Post
                          There is another option too..

                          Save the weight and get that back brake out of there.
                          "It's only getting worse."


                          MY rides: '97 VFR750, '90 Red Hawk, '88 Blue/Black Hawk, '86 RWB VFR700 (3), '86 Yamaha Radian, '90 VTR250, '89 VTR250 (2), '73 CB125, '66 Yamaha YL-1

                          Sold: '86 FJ1200, '92 ZX-7, '90 Radian, '73 CB750, '89 all-white Hawk, '88 blue Hawk, '86 FZ600, '86 Yam Fazer 700 , '89 VTR250, '87 VFR700F2, '86 VFR700F.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Don't need em. I put 10k on this thing, just like this.

                            IMG_20160730_115757.jpg

                            ON the bikea I have that have em, never touched em.. clutch and shift lever are all the rear brake I use.
                            Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

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