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Looking for front brake upgrade opinions/guidance

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    Looking for front brake upgrade opinions/guidance

    I have read through through a ton of the threads on here and the Facebook Hawk page about this subject. Some of them just left me with more questions and some reference dead links.
    I was hoping maybe you guys could help out with a more current set of options instead of going further down the rabbit hole.
    I am planning an upgrade but not 100% sure what path I want to follow. I do know that I am not looking to swap the whole front end.
    The bike is used for spirited street riding and commuting to work.
    Any opinions or suggestions would be appreciated.
    Here are my thoughts.

    Path 1
    New Braking wave rotor from Hord, rebuilding the stock master, caliper and ss brake line. (Not sure on pads with this either because of so many contradictory opinions)

    Path 2
    Wave rotor, ss line, single 6 pot with adaptor if I can find one or have one made or a bolt on from TL1000r. Is a new master needed or would a rebuild suffice? Suggestions on masters and pad type would be great.

    Path3
    Wave rotor, ss line, bolt on 4 pot from 1990 GSXR. Picture below. I really like the way this one looks (Somebody said these bolt on do they?) Has anybody used one? Same question about the master and pads.
    Screenshot_20220703-134147_eBay.jpg

    #2
    Path 1: Not a bad option. SS lines and some HH rated pads (DP, SBS, etc.) make a noticeable difference.

    Path 2: Very nice upgrade, if you can find an adapter for the six pot. The stock MC works well with Tokico six pot.

    Path 3: Another solid upgrade, but the 30/34 Nissin from the early 90s Gixxers/Bandit/RF900 is not a bolt on, it will need an adapter. However, those calipers are great. I like the Nissins better than the six piston options. Again, the stock MC will work fine. I run a Nissin like the one you have pictured on my track bike, albeit with an F3 wheel and disc and like it.
    ASMA #139

    Comment


      #3
      My $0.02 is option 1 and to forget HH pads and use organic ones.

      I also prefer Spiegler brake lines because you can get the lines and ends in different colors (I like my stuff not flashy and made choices that look as close to the stock color as possible. You can get them I'm Hot Pink if that's your thing, though.)
      Hord is (or at least was when I bought them) a Spiegler dealer.

      You do not have permission to view this gallery.
      This gallery has 1 photos.

      If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

      The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

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        #4
        If you want the wave disc, I would go with the pads recommended by the disc manufacturer, and only if they are not available for the stock caliper, I would look into other calipers and adaptors. If not satisfied with the performance, I would look at another mastercylinder first.

        But braking performance comes from more than the brakes - most important is technique, but also the suspension setup - the overall goal is to be able to load the front, not lock it.

        For road riding you need the brakes to adjust your speed for corners but also for critical situations where something blocks your path and you need to slow down at maximum rate - here technique is a primary concern and you need the setup to be able to use the right technique. So springs to suit, damping to suit, brakes that can be easily modulated to give the right braking performance without just being so powerful that they lock the front.

        I would go with a good qualtiy disc, pads that work with the disc material and when they are stone cold, good quality fluid, frequent service of the stock master and caliper, steel braided lines. And a good suspension setup, good tires and lots of practice...

        Personally I have several different setups, chosen for different reasons - and I want to remember to go practice, as this is where we all skimp in my experience...

        Comment


          #5
          JanM thanks for your input. I have only been riding for 3 years and only on this Hawk so I really don't have any thing to judge performance on other than the fact its feeling a bit softer lately. I also need to admit I think I just want to do an upgrade because I enjoy doing stuff like that, Plus I do like the look of the wave rotor.

          Comment


            #6
            This is what Option Two looks like. EBC Pro Lite rotor, Lenac Adapter, six pot Tokico. If we had a CAD file, I'm sure one of our forum members could make the adapter.
            With the wider CBR front wheel, this works very well for me.

            Tokico Hawk MED.jpg

            Comment


              #7
              HPbyGD might still be making the adapters; I’ve bought from him directly a couple of years ago. He was the supplier for Lenac.
              Flock of Hawks | '13 Tacoma | '69 Falcon (currently getting reassembled!)
              I've spent most of my money on women, beer, cars and motorcycles. The rest of it I just wasted.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally Posted by 69Falcon View Post
                HPbyGD might still be making the adapters; I’ve bought from him directly a couple of years ago. He was the supplier for Lenac.
                It looks like he hasn't been around since 2019 but maybe I will pm him. I have seen a bunch of people on here with the Lenac adaptors but I imagine most people don't have a spare. If anybody does feel free to contact me. I am surprised nobody sells any adaptors anymore. I might try to have one made for the gskr 4 pot just because I like the way it looks.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I ordered mine not that long ago. Try for a PM.

                  I haven't put it through the paces yet, but I'm happy with my 6 pot. Had it cleaned and cerakoted with new rubbers.

                  If it's feeling soft, have you done any maintenance on it? Last time you did a bleed? How old/worn are the disc and pads?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Definitely due for maintenance and a stock setup is probably fine but I like the look of the wave rotor.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally Posted by Smick6 View Post
                      JanM thanks for your input. I have only been riding for 3 years and only on this Hawk so I really don't have any thing to judge performance on other than the fact its feeling a bit softer lately. I also need to admit I think I just want to do an upgrade because I enjoy doing stuff like that, Plus I do like the look of the wave rotor.
                      Very honest answer. I appreciate that.

                      Jan is as usual right on point.

                      that's said ..... cool parts are fun and look awesome.

                      I don't think you will find any of the setups you list lack in "power". Very rarely am i on a street hawk and squeezing that lever with all I have wishing for more (two up riding being the exception, and I shouldn't ride like that with a passenger. I'm supposed to be a responsible person).
                      The six pot is a great setup, it's what we have on the race bike with a master from.... Somthing...( I don't remember. Crashed a few of them off and it's whatever was left in the spares bin that is on there now) and an ebc floater and their pads.. It's really good.

                      We also have a 6 pot on Chucks 2-up bike along with a bigger motor and stiffer shock to make a better two person hawk.

                      With your reasons for wanting to upgrade, I would have to advise to figure out what you want to spend, figure out what you think looks cool, and find a way to merge the two goals.

                      Sizing the caliper to the master is probably the biggest factor in the "feel" along with the pads.

                      Unless major mistakes are made you will end up with something that will do its job just fine and almost anything is an improvement over stock (though clean well bled stock setup with a braided line and good pads does pretty well for itself).

                      And I have to agree with ParcNHawk you should get the line in pink..




                      Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        If you don't have an adjustable brake lever, that is worth the price too.
                        Bill,
                        88 Blue Hawk (bike #39), 89 Red Hawk, 2021 Rebel 1100 (bike 41) Some Past/sold in reverse order:,FZ09,97 Magna #1&2 , 97 VFR750F, 87 VFR400R, 88 Hawk, 86 SRX 600, 77 RD400, 79 CB650, 04 VFR, 88 Blue Hawk, 89 Red Hawk, Yamaha SRX600, Harley 1200C, Yamaha RD400, Harley 883R, Yamaha 750 triple, Vlx600, Honda 450, Honda 400, CB550F, Kawasaki H1, BMW R69US, Yamaha R5C 350, Honda 160, Bridgestone 175, 1950 Harley 74 w/sidecar, 65 Harley 250 Sprint, 1948 Harley and my 1st bike-1941 Harley 74 knucklehead my dad gave in1963.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          people don't but outta clean rotors and pads occasionally with sandpaper and brake spray to remove glaze and oil residue.
                          Last edited by squirrelman; 07-04-2022, 09:09 PM.
                          "It's only getting worse."


                          MY rides: '97 VFR750, '90 Red Hawk, '88 Blue/Black Hawk, '86 RWB VFR700 (3), '86 Yamaha Radian, '90 VTR250, '89 VTR250 (2), '73 CB125, '66 Yamaha YL-1

                          Sold: '86 FJ1200, '92 ZX-7, '90 Radian, '73 CB750, '89 all-white Hawk, '88 blue Hawk, '86 FZ600, '86 Yam Fazer 700 , '89 VTR250, '87 VFR700F2, '86 VFR700F.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Not that anyone needs to volunteer this info but not everything needs to be CAD. With some spare time, the correct size of aluminum stock and some machinist files, hacksaw, vice, and accurate calpers you can make your own adapter. It's all just a process of measuring and patience.
                            88 Blue Hawk GT - Under construction but rideable (guest approved)
                            89 BlackHawk 2.0 - On the lift and being assembled
                            90 Hawk GT (color as to yet be determined) - Still on the shelf in crates

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally Posted by rpcraft View Post
                              Not that anyone needs to volunteer this info but not everything needs to be CAD. With some spare time, the correct size of aluminum stock and some machinist files, hacksaw, vice, and accurate calpers you can make your own adapter. It's all just a process of measuring and patience.
                              I do have a little experience in the 3d printing world. Modified a few files and made a few basic things. I might see if I can make a prototype to print.

                              Comment

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