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    EBC bedding in new brake pads procedure

    https://ebcbrakes.com/articles/motorcycle-bed-in/

    January 3, 2013 Bedding in new motorcycle pads and rotors

    0 Comment
    Bedding in new motorcycle pads and rotors



    After 35 years as the worlds number one brand, EBC Brakes has accumulated massive experience on how to guide its customers to enjoy their brake products safely.
    Bedding in new motorcycle pads and rotors is an extremely important process – please follow these guidelines:

    Fitting New Disc Pads To Used Brake Discs/Rotors

    First of all, there are two different types of brake pad on the world markets which are sintered copper alloy or organic types. The sintered types are of course much harder and take 3-5 times longer to bed in GEOMETRICALLY to any hollow areas or ridges on a worn brake rotor. Organic pads being slightly softer bed in more quickly but also suffer from what is known as “green fade”. Green fade is explained as a heat curing of the brake material which happens over the first heavy heat cycles.

    To bed in sintered pads, drive the vehicle carefully allowing extra braking distance for the first 300 miles. Please be aware that brake performance during the bed in period may be significantly less than you have been accustomed to. What you are looking for is to see a 90%+ surface area contact between the pad and the disc or rotor before optimum braking will be achieved.

    Once your pads are 90% surface area bedded after the 300-400 miles, on a safe road, use the brakes 10 times in succession stopping your motorcycle from 60mph to 20mph to get the brakes deliberately hot. This is particularly important with the organic versions (aramid fibre types, carbon based pad types and semi-metallic pad types). After this process, the pads should settle down and normal riding and brake performance can be safely achieved.

    Fitting New Disc Pads With New Brake Discs/Rotors

    Although the brake disc/rotor surface will be perfectly flat when using a new rotor, it is still extremely important to “condition” the brake discs and match them up to your pads by driving gently for 200-300 miles. After this period, perform the heat bedding of organic pads as above in blue text.

    Always remember not to contaminate your brake pads with any fluids or greases (even brake fluid) during the install process.

    If you experience any vibration or serious loss of brake during this process, contact a professional motorcycle dealer for assistance.

    Bedding In New Brakes for Trackday or Race Use

    If you are using your motorcycle for a trackday or race event, bedding in the new pads is even more important. 99% of racers use sintered pads for trackday and race events because they do not require chemical bedding as in blue above, but these pads still need to be matched to the rotor and therefore a bedding in process of 2-3 laps gentle brake use gradually increasing brake pressure and load after that has been completed is advisable.

    EBC Brakes make some excellent trackday pads such as their EPFA range or the full race GPFAX range
    "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

    #2
    So take it easy for a couple laps?? Is that for saftey
    or preformance reasons?

    I have put new pads on straight before a race... Oops.

    Good info Bart! Thanks!
    Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks for the tip. I did not find this recommendation on the EBC rotor instructions, nor the HH pads (both new). It does say to drive gently at first. But I had about 300 miles on the conversion, so yesterday I found a back road, did the 10 strong stops, and bedded them in. Very much better.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally Posted by 6 View Post
        So take it easy for a couple laps?? Is that for saftey
        or preformance reasons?

        I have put new pads on straight before a race... Oops.

        Good info Bart! Thanks!
        safety and performance
        88 Blue Hawk GT - Under construction but rideable (guest approved)
        89 BlackHawk 2.0 - On the lift and being assembled
        90 Hawk GT (color as to yet be determined) - Still on the shelf in crates

        Comment


          #5
          I had my ex's bike, with a new EBC Pro-lite disk , 6 pot Tokico and EBC HH pads. I swear I had a EBC document that besides the 300 mi gentle braking , they suggested removing the pads and a inspection for tiny imbedded steel splinters from the disk sheadding some surface material while in the bedding processes.

          They suggested using some small tweezers to remove these steel splinters without digging into the pad material. They said this was optional, but that it would help a faster bedding.

          We,'ve got no place here on public rorad to do ten, 60 to 30mph hard braking without getting a ticket or rear ended. I went out to Kipo falls road, (a country road little traffic if any) and proceeded to do the required hard deceleration applications as prescribed with a cooling period between each. Up and down that road for a few hours before I was happy with the results.

          Linda ( and a bunch of street riders ) would just never have gotten the hard braking part to finish up the bedding.

          Pads that aren't bedded as per the manufactures instruction, can have poor performance and often become " glazed " from constant over heating And they are garbage now IMO. I'm super picky about my brake performance so that's why I put in the time to get them set-up right.

          To be noted: not all pads require the same Break in , so when in doubt, spend some time to find the bedding specs for your brand and type of material.

          it's also suggested by some manufacturers to clean the brake pad compound off your disks when changing brand or type of friction material. I just use a maroon scotch brite pad.

          My Bandit had glazed EBC organic pads form the OP, that sucked so hard they could take the chrome off a trailer hitch.

          It's a big fast bike and I wanted some real stopping power. JD
          Hordpower suggested some SBS pads. They are famtasic. Fast easy bedding and they work hot or cold, and in the rain, never fade, well not in the street anyway.
          SPA
          Callsign Haolewood
          Last edited by SPA; 04-27-2018, 05:28 PM.
          "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

          Comment


            #6
            Originally Posted by SPA View Post
            .

            We,'ve got no place here on public road to do ten, 60 to 30mph hard braking :
            Ok, Cool! That's just a lap....

            So I'll be ok... We have brand new EBC pads in it now... No time to break in.... Whelp. I'll take it easy lap one.
            Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

            Comment


              #7
              Says ,


              Bedding In New Brakes for Trackday or Race Use

              If you are using your motorcycle for a trackday or race event, bedding in the new pads is even more important. 99% of racers use sintered pads for trackday and race events because they do not require chemical bedding as in blue above, but these pads still need to be matched to the rotor and therefore a bedding in process of 2-3 laps gentle brake use gradually increasing brake pressure and load after that has been completed is advisable.

              EBC Brakes make some excellent trackday pads such as their EPFA range or the full race GPFAX range
              "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

              Comment


                #8
                Good clean flat surface on your rotors ? Not grooved by previous pads? But like they were saying " matched to the rotor which if there are grooves, it takes awhile to get the corresponding groove in your pads, and what ever you do don't ever accidentally
                swap sides when working on the front end. Mark em L, R ,
                "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally Posted by SPA View Post
                  Good clean flat surface on your rotors ? Not grooved by previous pads? But like they were saying " matched to the rotor which if there are grooves, it takes awhile to get the corresponding groove in your pads, and what ever you do don't ever accidentally
                  swap sides when working on the front end. Mark em L, R ,
                  The rotor is mint. I have a couple laps I can take it easy ish... still working out the jetting so I'll do it in the am
                  Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally Posted by 6 View Post

                    The rotor is mint. I have a couple laps I can take it easy ish... still working out the jetting so I'll do it in the am


                    New HH pads and a EBC Rotor ?

                    if so ... EBC rotors have a higher iron content, better friction coefficient than Stainless stock rotors.

                    from above post ,

                    I had my ex's bike, with a new EBC Pro-lite disk , 6 pot Tokico and EBC HH pads. I swear I had a EBC document that besides the 300 mi gentle braking , they suggested removing the pads and a inspection for tiny imbedded steel splinters from the disk shedding some surface material while in the bedding processes.

                    They suggested using some small tweezers to remove these steel splinters without digging into the pad material. They said this was optional, but that it would help a faster bedding.
                    SPA
                    Callsign Haolewood
                    Last edited by SPA; 04-28-2018, 12:12 AM.
                    "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

                    Comment


                      #11
                      https://ebcbrakes.com/articles/rotor...s/#site-canvas

                      2, 2013 Rotor quality and bedding in new rotors

                      0 Comment Rotor quality and bedding in new rotors

                      Lets discuss what goes wrong with new rotors, rotor quality and bedding in new rotors and how to avoid problems.
                      Basically two problems can occur on new rotors in early use after install connected with rotor quality and bedding in new rotors.
                      • Thermal settling and
                      • DTV (Disc Thickness variation).

                      It has to be said that rotor quality in general in the after-market (in our opinion) has fallen dramatically over the last 3-6 years with the flood of Asian product. We see and hear of main dealers who apologise for their own brake rotor product quality and say that brake discs do not even span service intervals in some cases. EBC has had to adapt brake pad materials to live with “Whats out there” simply because we sell ten times as many pads as we do rotors .We can tell you some discussions with customers can become quite heated. Lets attempt here to explain what we consider YOUR and EBC Brakes best way forward to be without doing a lot of competitor bashing.

                      First it is clear that all brake rotors coming from Asian suppliers are not “Aged” and are certainly not “Normalised” or heat treated castings which was the old method a few years ago to get a good casting quality. Cast Iron from which all brake rotors are made for cars and light trucks is almost a live or natural material and it needs to settle down or age after it is cast. During the first weeks after casting the brake disc may well settle by a few thousandths.

                      The amount of this distortion is minimal and will not always show up a brake judder problem. Used with the right pads this minimal brake distortion which people call warped rotors will actually correct by the mild abrasive nature of the pad in early driving. So the small initial rotor distortion is not a problem in itself and using good brake pads that have the correct balance of compressibility, thermal conductivity and ability to gently scrub and correct these minor changes is advisable.

                      So using good pads, quality rotors and driving the vehicle gently during bed in is a good idea.

                      It is far more important when bedding in new rotorsto bed in a new rotor than it is a new brake pad. When changing brakes you should drive steadily for up to 1000 miles to condition the brake rotor as well as the brake pad. The gentle warming and cooling of the rotor takes it through this ageing or normalising process to some degree that should have been done at the brake rotor factory but unfortunately isn’t. Again the unfortunate fact is that if any brake rotor factory started doing what is needed to produce a thermally stable aged casting, they would go out of business in months from lack of sales because no-one would pay the price. So everyone is up to the same tricks in response to market pressures and we all have to learn to live with it. Click here for full tech specs and details of EBC and other after-market rotors and how to get the best from your new brake rotors.

                      DTV or disc thickness variation which is the most common cause of rotor vibration problems is not caused by rotor quality but is a VEHICLE problem and we strongly advise you to watch this VIDEO




                      Plain rotors cost less and rotors without slots are less money to buy for sure but can exhibit some problems. Therefore it’s always a good idea to consider rotor quality before buying.

                      Firstly the phenomenon known as rotor galling or brake rotor ribbing or rotor scoring happens everyday with the world being full of fairly soft cast iron rotors. The better the pad the more likely a plain (not slotted) rotor will suffer rotor ribbing. The picture below shows a typical normal rotor that is suffering from rotor ribbing.

                      Rotor quality and bedding in new rotors EBC image

                      You don’t throw this rotor away, it is not ideal but it is not a safety issue either, you just have to live with this condition unless you want to upgrade to a slotted brake rotor. Slotted rotors have a major benefit in smoothing the brake pad gently as it wears through its useful life, the slots do NOT cheese grate the pads away surprisingly enough and lifetimes can actually be BETTER on a brake pads used against slotted rotors than one used on plain brake rotors because the pad runs cooler and more efficiently.

                      This is what a slotted rotor looks like after 10,000 miles using the same pads as the plain rotor in the illustration above.

                      Rotor quality and bedding in new rotors EBC image

                      EBC only offers a cross drilled rotor for certain cars where the originals are cross drilled. If designed correctly and holes are carefully aligned with the internal vanes of the disc and not randomly drilled and IF THE HOLES ARE CHAMFERED OR CAST INTO THE ROTOR, these will work well. EBC does not sell, support, condone or recommend the use of randomly drilled aftermarket “Sport” rotors which do NOTHING to enhance performance and can and DO CRACK AND CAN CAUSE SERIOUS INCIDENTS
                      "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally Posted by SPA View Post



                        New HH pads and a EBC Rotor ?

                        if so ... EBC rotors have a higher iron content, better friction coefficient than Stainless stock rotors.

                        from above post ,
                        Yes, it's the ebc rotor and the hh pads in a 6 pot tok. Probabl more brakes than I'll use this weekend haha.
                        Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Take a pair of tweezers... https://www.hawkgtforum.com/forum/ho...474#post841474
                          "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Stolen from CBRxx forum

                            Bed-in for EBC HH and HH 'kit' pads (the ones with the green sticker)
                            In reading various brake threads around here, I've come across a couple of folks mentioning bedding in the EBC HH pads, and in both cases they mentioned bedding them in over a bit of time. I raced w. EBC sponsorship for 4 seasons, so I have lots of experience with these pads, so I wanted to help out.
                            These pads do not do nearly as well as they could re: initial bite if you bed them in gently. The right way to bed these pads in is to accelerate to about 35-40, then brake very hard (don't flip over or lose the front, but hard). Come almost to a stop but not quite, and repeat. Do this about 10 times in rapid succession, and that's it. You're ready to go. No more bed-in needed...ride it like you stole it.
                            I understand that this is counter to the way you're used to bedding in
                            "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

                            Comment


                              #15
                              ah - two sighting laps of pembrey last year....erk. Worked alright though!

                              Comment

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