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89 resto w significant hiccup to begin

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    89 resto w significant hiccup to begin

    Starting point: complete undamaged Hawk that has been sitting under a tree for an unknown number of years:
    EE7A963E-70C3-4E85-8A90-E46C8AB6E55C.jpeg


    Step 1 - get the frozen gas cap off
    BC80D3F4-AF45-4716-8E44-21BBDFE53ABD.jpeg

    Step 2 - finish crying about the state of the tank and start working on it.

    Step 3 - next time remember to check the bottom of the tank for leaks before attempting to fill with Evaporust
    C77132FA-6A30-4675-A6F6-89EBC24862E9.jpeg

    Step 4 - clean Evaporust off workbench and garage floor

    Step 5 - stop obsessively reading Hawk threads and dreaming about a 700cc Hord engine, Hord forks, and other low priority bling

    Step 6 - get back to work on the Hawk
    Attached Files

    #2
    The 89 was going to be for my Dad, but it’s turned out to be a longer road than anticipated.

    I managed to find a very nice 88 when on a work trip to the bay area - thanks forum member 44duguay! 6889 miles, some pitting on the engine cases and leaking fork seals. Dad likes it. I posted this photo in the fork rebuild thread, but it’s relevant here because Dad won’t die before getting to ride a Hawk - he might not last until I finish the 89...
    B1C6595E-1909-4480-901F-D1166318C553.jpeg
    Last edited by sfdownhill; 08-27-2021, 07:13 PM.

    Comment


      #3
      Your dad looks happy on it. Wish him many happy miles too.

      You might find that most of the pitting is in the clear coat over the polished cases / forks. Try some a spot with a little paint remover and see what it looks like after the clear coat is removed. It might polish and look great. I have done the forks and engine cases without removing them. Just protect the surrounding areas with tape or cardboard.

      Give him a jar of Mothers Mag and Wheel Polish and some steel wool so he can rub on the pipes. He might enjoy the exercise and the looks when done. 2000 grit and the polish works well after the worst is removed.
      Last edited by BillnOroville; 08-26-2021, 11:15 PM.
      Bill,
      88 Blue Hawk (bike #39), 89 Red Hawk, 2021 Rebel 1100 (bike 41) Some Past/sold in reverse order:,FZ09,97 Magna #1&2 , 97 VFR750F, 87 VFR400R, 88 Hawk, 86 SRX 600, 77 RD400, 79 CB650, 04 VFR, 88 Blue Hawk, 89 Red Hawk, Yamaha SRX600, Harley 1200C, Yamaha RD400, Harley 883R, Yamaha 750 triple, Vlx600, Honda 450, Honda 400, CB550F, Kawasaki H1, BMW R69US, Yamaha R5C 350, Honda 160, Bridgestone 175, 1950 Harley 74 w/sidecar, 65 Harley 250 Sprint, 1948 Harley and my 1st bike-1941 Harley 74 knucklehead my dad gave in1963.

      Comment


        #4
        Hi I have a similar story I am the owner of a Bros 400 which been has in a dry store under my house for around 10 years plus bringing back to uk in December haven’t made my mind up what to do with it it’s to good to scrap
        You do not have permission to view this gallery.
        This gallery has 2 photos.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally Posted by sfdownhill View Post
          The 89 was going to be for my Dad, but it’s going to be a longer than anticipated road.

          I managed to find a very nice 88 when on a work trip to the bay area. 6889 miles, some pitting on the engine cases and leaking fork seals. Dad likes it. I posted this photo in the fork rebuild thread, but it’s relevant here because Dad won’t die before getting to ride a Hawk - he might not last until I finish the 89...
          I had good luck on the engine cases removing the coating and corrosion with a 3M Red Scotchbrite pad. That gives a brushed finish. Then if you want a high polish, you can go to Mother's Mag Polish, or Red Buffing Compound (stick) and a Dremel buffing wheel.

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks guys - the encouragement is a big help.

            Bill - I’ll get a jar of the Mother’s (Meguiar’s?) mag and wheel polish into Dad’s hands and see what he does with it.

            Winetaster - you’re in the same spot! A nice, undamaged, complete bike within unknown issues possibly lurking. Since I joined this forum - recently - I’ve seen a lot of reference to the Bros model, but have never seen one and don’t know what it is. Sounds like a euro model of the Hawk, available in 400cc, maybe 650cc too?

            Rick, I’ll add 3M red scotchbright pads to the shopping list.

            Am currently finishing replacing fork seals, bushings, and oil on Dad’s 88. Then a quick engine oil/filter change, clean/lube chain and sprockets, flush brake fluid with new, and we should be ready to get him out on the road. Then back to the 89. I’m on the fence about whether to introduce Packtalk communications devices to Dad’s first couple rides. I have a pair and both our helmets are set up with Packtalk systems, but the voice comms could be distracting. I’ll just ask and see how he feels about it.

            Comment


              #7
              I both envy and celebrate riders who get to share their passions and experiences with their families, especially those who are raised moto. I wish I had been one of those lucky ones
              My pronouns are she/hers.

              To ride is to live.

              There, and back again. (photos from the epic journey)


              '88 Hawk GT (Rekka)
              '07 Shadow 600 (Gremlin)

              '90 Hawk GT (Fireball/red-tailed hawk) RIP

              Comment


                #8
                Does anyone recognize this shock? It came on the 89. I couldn’t locate any logos or markings, at least not while it’s still installed. It has a remote reservoir with a single adjustment knob, and a fitting near the base of the shock body that may be an allen-operated adjuster. There are tiny markings on the adjuster around the allen fitting, but even with my reading glasses and a flashlight, I couldn’t make them out.
                E0856619-3254-46C5-BBBC-6C1AEC2EE8F9.jpeg

                34F7C169-2F09-48E5-B498-DAE48FCA3BA5.jpeg
                F67E678E-C9E4-4DCE-90BC-A792721FDBE0.jpeg

                41914DE5-4F80-4FEC-9075-44315492E1B5.jpeg
                93263FBA-24C3-425B-8088-FAA14A5C5FB0.jpeg

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally Posted by sfdownhill View Post
                  Does anyone recognize this shock? It came on the 89. I couldn’t locate any logos or markings, at least not while it’s still installed. It has a remote reservoir with a single adjustment knob, and a fitting near the base of the shock body that may be an allen-operated adjuster. There are tiny markings on the adjuster around the allen fitting, but even with my reading glasses and a flashlight, I couldn’t
                  The rebound adjuster looks like a Progressive shock. I forget which model had the separate reservoir.

                  EDIT: Pretty sure that's a Progressive 415.
                  Talon
                  The Man, The Myth, The Talon
                  Last edited by Talon; 08-29-2021, 11:51 PM.
                  ASMA #139

                  Comment


                    #10
                    “The rebound adjuster looks like a Progressive shock. I forget which model had the separate reservoir.

                    EDIT: Pretty sure that's a Progressive 415.”

                    Cool - thanks Talon. Looks like I’ll have some homework on who to have rebuild a Progressive shock.

                    Any suggestions?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally Posted by sfdownhill View Post
                      &

                      Any suggestions?
                      Ya, buy a Penske
                      Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        But for real, I'm sure you could get the shock rebuilt. There is still no height adjustment which to me is the #1 reason to have an aftermarket shock.

                        When you find the cost to rebuild that compare it to the cost of getting a cheap height adjustable shock new or used.

                        Best thing you can do to a hawk is Jack the ass end up.
                        Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally Posted by 6 View Post
                          But for real, I'm sure you could get the shock rebuilt. There is still no height adjustment which to me is the #1 reason to have an aftermarket shock.

                          When you find the cost to rebuild that compare it to the cost of getting a cheap height adjustable shock new or used.

                          Best thing you can do to a hawk is Jack the ass end up.

                          Easy for you to say, you are not short....
                          Bill,
                          88 Blue Hawk (bike #39), 89 Red Hawk, 2021 Rebel 1100 (bike 41) Some Past/sold in reverse order:,FZ09,97 Magna #1&2 , 97 VFR750F, 87 VFR400R, 88 Hawk, 86 SRX 600, 77 RD400, 79 CB650, 04 VFR, 88 Blue Hawk, 89 Red Hawk, Yamaha SRX600, Harley 1200C, Yamaha RD400, Harley 883R, Yamaha 750 triple, Vlx600, Honda 450, Honda 400, CB550F, Kawasaki H1, BMW R69US, Yamaha R5C 350, Honda 160, Bridgestone 175, 1950 Harley 74 w/sidecar, 65 Harley 250 Sprint, 1948 Harley and my 1st bike-1941 Harley 74 knucklehead my dad gave in1963.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally Posted by 6 View Post

                            Ya, buy a Penske
                            Now that raht thar iz funnee

                            So true 6. It couldn't cost less than $250 to revive this old shock...$250 goes a fair ways toward a good used Penske.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              An alternative shock would be a YSS in the $400 price range.
                              "Red hair and black leather, my favorite color scheme"
                              1952 Vincent Black Lightning by Richard Thompson


                              '88 Blue 99% stock SOLD
                              '88 Restomod
                              '16 Yamaha FJ-09

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