Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Cheese's Hawk(s)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    The Cheese's Hawk(s)

    ​This thread is not really a "build thread". I won't be doing much building or modification. I will be bringing a red Hawk back to life. Then selling. Which will allow me to focus on my blue Hawk. Which I predict will be with me a very long time.

    It started with buying an 89 Honda Hawk. Red. 21K miles. Two bros full exhaust. UNI pods. Jetted. F2 fuel tank. Corbin seat. Cheap ebay pegs. Pretty much stock other than that. Been sitting a claimed 5 years. The body work was in rough shape. Turn signals were LED and falling off. Stuff was faded badly. Tires were from 2003. Battery long dead. Drove 7 hours to get it. Tennessee. It was a bit rougher than I thought it would be. But it was cheap. So I loaded it up and drove it home. Another 6 hours. What have I got into?



    Over the next few days I started looking it over better. Really taking in how much trouble I was in. I started researching it online. Which brought me here. I read a buncha threads. Planned on what I wanted to do. Mostly thought about the amount of work I had to get it where I wanted. A mostly stock bike. A big task. Then I found the classifieds.

    A blue 88 was for sale. Within 5 hours of me. Much more than I paid for the other bike. Much better shape too. It was shiny. I was in love. Problem was I spent all I had getting the red bike. I mean an overnight trip to get a motorcycle isnt cheap. Fuel, hotel, food and the cost of the bike added up quick. I was broke. At this point it had only been a week since I bought the red one. Now I wanted to buy another. What's wrong with me? I wished the seller good luck with the sale. I just knew it would sell before I could raise the money. I was sad.

    A week later, and a small loan later, I said screw it. I want it. I went to Alabama and bought it. Really nice guy. Took great care of it. So did the owners before him. He barely rode it in his 8 years of ownership. He/they kept everything they took off it. Came with a tote of take offs/extras. Even the instructions to the Factory Pro jetting kit, the member made tip over protectors, factory repair manual, lots of new in bag Honda parts, extra seat, mirrors, and half a gallon of Honda oil.

    37K miles. Corbin seat. K&N pods. Factory pro carb kit. LED signals. Muzzy muffler. Tip over thingys. Bar end mirrors. Super clean. Shiny.



    I have not done much to the blue bike since bringing it home. I did rob it's battery for the red bike. Took off the bar end mirrors. Put the stock seat on it. I'm waiting on selling the red bike before doing anything to it. I need to focus funds, my attention, and what little shed space I have left on the red bike. The tires are old enough for me to not ride it until they are replaced. It's hard buying a new bike, but not riding it.

    Speaking of the red bike. I have done a few things to it since purchase. I gave it a good washing. Ultrasonic bath for the carb bodies. New o rings for drain screws and air cut off valves. Everything else in the carbs was good enough to reuse after a good cleaning. Slow jets were plugged up solid. Worst I have seen. It took a week of soaking in a jar of carb cleaner to start to clean up. I had to get the center hole cleared with a small drill set. I know what you're thinking. Drill? Carb jets? NO! These are tiny. No way as large as the orifice. Used properly you can clean out jets with them. I filled the fuel hoses with 100% Seafoam. To fill the fuel pump with it. To try and loosen up the stale fuel.

    I ignored the F2 tank. For now. It was bad. Carbs went back on. New (used) battery. Oil and filter changed. New spark plugs. Replaced the majority of the fuel hoses. Made a temp fuel tank out of a pressure washer soap container. After turning the kill switch on I ran the starter awhile. To fill the carb bowls. Let it sit. Turn it over. Let it sit. Then tried starting with kill switch off. After some grumbles it starts! It lives! Oh no. It leaks fuel from the drain screws. So back off the carbs come. Replace the drain screw o rings. Back on the carbs go. Thankfully this is easy compared to my usual ride. A ST1100. A V4. At this point I'm tired of having to untie the fuel tank form the rafters. So I affix it to a temp wood frame.

    I turn my attention to the gas tank. I can not describe how bad this tank it. Or how strong it smells of stale fuel. Really. I have had a few bikes in the past. Most were bought after sitting up. I'm familiar with stale fuel. This tank was on a completely different level. ​I could smell it in the PO garage. While walking up to it I smelled stale fuel. I put off cleaning it out, because I didn't want to deal with it. I looked into buying a used tank. NO used Hawk tanks. As you know. A few used F2 tanks for sale, but not much better than I have now. So I bought some Evaporust. It did nothing. Even after a few days soak.

    I have used citric acid in the past while cleaning up metal parts on Coleman lanterns. My other habit. So I mixed up 5 gals and poured it in. Get 5 gallons of water to an almost boil. Mix in 5 cups of powdered citric acid. Stir well. That seemed to start to break up the hard fuel into chunks. After soaking a few days I rinse well with a hose. Anther soak in citric acid for a few days. Another rinse. Another batch of citric acid. This time I let soak for a week. Rinse with garden hose. At this point I get clear water coming out. Most of the hard cracker like fuel is gone. I see clean grey metal. No rust. No holes. I fill it with water I have on hand. A mix of gas, kerosene, and two stroke fuel. Just to keep the inside from flash rusting. At this point I ma just over doing this. I'm done.

    That's where the red bike is currently. I am almost ready to list it for sale. I need to renew the brake fluid, finish the tank, replace the brake pedal, balance the carbs, and put the tank n seat back on. It will be up to the new owner to take it from there.

    The blue bike has tires, battery, and a few small things incoming. I want a RAM ball in the steering stem. I have a plan for that. Who knows if It will work out. I have a tankbag set aside for it. A 10 liter waterproof GIVI. The exact bag I have on my main ride. It will have two USB outlets inside. I plan to put the stock mirrors and turn signals back on it. Coolant and brake fluid renew. New spark plugs. Then I get to ride it.

    After riding it for awhile I will know better the exact direction I want to take. I will likely take the forks to Traxxion in Atlanta. Combine with a Penske rear shock. Just like how my ST1100 is set up. They did a wonderful job on it. So I see no reason to try anything different.

    Sorry to ramble on. Here is a link to the Imgur album. It has detailed shots of how the F2 tank is mounted. https://thacheese.imgur.com/all/#1

    Here is the overall album. It contains all the pics. https://thacheese.imgur.com/all/
    1988 Hawk
    1989 Hawk
    1998 ST1100
    1999 ST1100
    North Georgia

    #2
    That blue bike is a beauty. It looks familiar, and I believe those are Brent's frame sliders on there.

    Red bike sounds like a but of a project, but a worth while one.

    And yes, a set of fork springs and emulators up front and a Penske out back (I would suggest a length adjustable one as the hawk does great with the tail end jacked up) will transform that bikes ride.

    Congratulations on the bikes, welcome to the obsession.

    May I suggest keeping the red bike. . Because here is how this works.

    You get the blue bike just how you want it, nice clean stock bike with tasteful mods on it. You love it. Then you start thinking of some more mods you want to do, but not to your clean stock bike... Can't do that. So then you buy a second bike to throw the crazy stuff at. Happens to all of us.

    You are already a step ahead of the game.. you have your clean bike and your project bike.

    Twas fate, just run with it.
    Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally Posted by 6 View Post

      May I suggest keeping the red bike. . Because here is how this works:

      You get the blue bike just how you want it, nice clean stock bike with tasteful mods on it. You love it. Then you start thinking of some more mods you want to do, but not to your clean stock bike... Can't do that. So then you buy a second bike to throw the crazy stuff at. Happens to all of us.
      Truth!
      Attached Files
      ASMA #139

      Comment


        #4
        Originally Posted by 6 View Post
        That blue bike is a beauty. It looks familiar, and I believe those are Brent's frame sliders on there.

        Red bike sounds like a but of a project, but a worth while one.

        And yes, a set of fork springs and emulators up front and a Penske out back (I would suggest a length adjustable one as the hawk does great with the tail end jacked up) will transform that bikes ride.

        Congratulations on the bikes, welcome to the obsession.

        May I suggest keeping the red bike. . Because here is how this works.

        You get the blue bike just how you want it, nice clean stock bike with tasteful mods on it. You love it. Then you start thinking of some more mods you want to do, but not to your clean stock bike... Can't do that. So then you buy a second bike to throw the crazy stuff at. Happens to all of us.

        You are already a step ahead of the game.. you have your clean bike and your project bike.

        Twas fate, just run with it.
        My Wife is trying to talk me into keeping it as well. I wish I could. I really need the space. I've always wanted a Hawk. Now that I'm at a point in life I can afford one, I see no reason not to. But two? Not sure about that yet.
        1988 Hawk
        1989 Hawk
        1998 ST1100
        1999 ST1100
        North Georgia

        Comment


          #5
          Originally Posted by The Cheese View Post

          My Wife is trying to talk me into keeping it as well. I wish I could. I really need the space. I've always wanted a Hawk. Now that I'm at a point in life I can afford one, I see no reason not to. But two? Not sure about that yet.
          One is a hawk, the other one becomes your art piece. Hawk is well used as a platform for mechanical expression.
          Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally Posted by The Cheese View Post

            My Wife is trying to talk me into keeping it as well. I wish I could. I really need the space. I've always wanted a Hawk. Now that I'm at a point in life I can afford one, I see no reason not to. But two? Not sure about that yet.
            Just compromise with the wife, tell her you can keep the bike if you build a bigger Hawk nest! That's a win-win!
            88 Blue Hawk GT - Under construction but rideable (guest approved)
            89 BlackHawk 2.0 - On the lift and being assembled
            90 Hawk GT (color as to yet be determined) - Still on the shelf in crates

            Comment


              #7
              I have narrowed it down to two names. Should I go with Shelia or Bonnie? Seems like either personalized tag is available.

              Bonnie McMurry from Letterkenny.

              Sheila is the first name of Dr. Mrs. The Monarch from Venture Bros.
              1988 Hawk
              1989 Hawk
              1998 ST1100
              1999 ST1100
              North Georgia

              Comment


                #8
                Bonnie was a forum member here. The only one i've ever know. That's all i think about when i hear that name.

                Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Well now. I have another question. I have cleaned the tank of the dried fuel. Or whatever it was. It's now flash rusting tho. I flushed well after the citric acid soak and poured a mix of kerosene, two stroke fuel mix, and gas into it. Filled it half way up. That's all I had on hand. I will rinse again with citric acid this weekend. Then what? Fill it up completely with gas? Mix in a little two stroke oil? Some kinda sealant? I DO NOT WANT TO LINE IT. I'm not asking for advise on any liner type coating. Just something to keep it from flash rusting.

                  Thanks.
                  1988 Hawk
                  1989 Hawk
                  1998 ST1100
                  1999 ST1100
                  North Georgia

                  Comment


                    #10
                    If you do not plan on lining it all you can do really is fill it with fuel and keep it as full as possible. The only other thing you can do is maybe mix some heavy oil like 50 weight or something that is not just going to wash away immediately and then do it again every few tanks.
                    88 Blue Hawk GT - Under construction but rideable (guest approved)
                    89 BlackHawk 2.0 - On the lift and being assembled
                    90 Hawk GT (color as to yet be determined) - Still on the shelf in crates

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally Posted by The Cheese View Post
                      Well now. I have another question. I have cleaned the tank of the dried fuel. Or whatever it was. It's now flash rusting tho. I flushed well after the citric acid soak and poured a mix of kerosene, two stroke fuel mix, and gas into it. Filled it half way up. That's all I had on hand. I will rinse again with citric acid this weekend. Then what? Fill it up completely with gas? Mix in a little two stroke oil? Some kinda sealant? I DO NOT WANT TO LINE IT. I'm not asking for advise on any liner type coating. Just something to keep it from flash rusting.

                      Thanks.
                      Try some oil, maybe wd? It's a tough puzzle to solve.


                      Keeping it full of gas doesn't fully keep the rust away. I've seen full to the tip top tanks that where just cleaned rust within a week.

                      Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Today I played with the red fuel tank. Turns out it isn't very rusty inside. Which is wonderful news. The day I checked it I was in a rush to get to work. I guess I didn't look as bad as I thought. The kero didn't mix well with the gas. Combine the leftover dried gas cracker chunks and it looked worse than it was. I flushed it out. Again. This time with two gals of fresh gas. Then filled it to the top with fresh gas. My hope is that the remaining fuel cracker chunks dissolve.



                        I found another brake pedal. More accurately it found me. Waiting for it to ship.

                        I started an oil change in the blue bike. I told myself I would wait until the red bike was gone. It has delayed my progress long enough. I say started because it still isn't finished. I thought I had the correct weight oil. Turns out the carside pickup at Wal-mart has stuck again. They sent the wrong weight. Only found out after I drained it and replaced the oil filter. I found the more expensive HONDA filter on it. $19.44 plus shipping and tax at partzilla. No thanks. Wix will do just fine. Side note. I can use the same filter for my Hawk and my ST1100. Wix #51356. Yea!
                        1988 Hawk
                        1989 Hawk
                        1998 ST1100
                        1999 ST1100
                        North Georgia

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I still have the red tank soaking in fuel. Just because I have not found the time to mess with it more.

                          I did find time to finish the oil change today. I thought it was a tad strange that it took 2.6 quarts. I also changed the spark plugs. I messed around with the chain slack. Although I'm not certain that it is set correctly. I have read here that the Honda procedure is too tight. So I made a little cardboard measure tool. As the factory one is missing from my kit. I set it at Honda spec first. Looked ok. Perhaps a tad too tight. Slacked off some and it looks too loose. Having little experience to draw from I set it loose. Didn't seem to have small increments of adjustment. I was running out of time and rushed through it. I'll try again next weekend.



                          Above pic is how it currently is. Note that I am sitting on the bike. I am compressing the rear shock as much I would riding it. Or close to. The chain seems too loose right now. It is laying on the black plastic chain "slider?" on top of swingarm. Then on the bottom it is laying on that black plastic chain slider. I would imagine if I rode it right now it would eat into those two items. Hearing about setting it way looser than you think, must have made me err on the wrong side.

                          I went to install the used brake pedal on the red bike. Only to find the circle clip on the back of it missing. So I will have to buy a assorted set of circlips. Till next weekend on it too.

                          I still have not rode either bike. As the tires are way too old. Getting to bother me more and more that I'm not. I have tires in hand. I just have to find the time to fix my changer, then change them. I have never balanced a rear wheel for a SSSA before. Tips on how to hold it on a balance shaft?
                          1988 Hawk
                          1989 Hawk
                          1998 ST1100
                          1999 ST1100
                          North Georgia

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally Posted by The Cheese View Post
                            I still have the red tank soaking in fuel. Just because I have not found the time to mess with it more.

                            I did find time to finish the oil change today. I thought it was a tad strange that it took 2.6 quarts. I also changed the spark plugs. I messed around with the chain slack. Although I'm not certain that it is set correctly. I have read here that the Honda procedure is too tight. So I made a little cardboard measure tool. As the factory one is missing from my kit. I set it at Honda spec first. Looked ok. Perhaps a tad too tight. Slacked off some and it looks too loose. Having little experience to draw from I set it loose. Didn't seem to have small increments of adjustment. I was running out of time and rushed through it. I'll try again next weekend.



                            Above pic is how it currently is. Note that I am sitting on the bike. I am compressing the rear shock as much I would riding it. Or close to. The chain seems too loose right now. It is laying on the black plastic chain "slider?" on top of swingarm. Then on the bottom it is laying on that black plastic chain slider. I would imagine if I rode it right now it would eat into those two items. Hearing about setting it way looser than you think, must have made me err on the wrong side.

                            I went to install the used brake pedal on the red bike. Only to find the circle clip on the back of it missing. So I will have to buy a assorted set of circlips. Till next weekend on it too.

                            I still have not rode either bike. As the tires are way too old. Getting to bother me more and more that I'm not. I have tires in hand. I just have to find the time to fix my changer, then change them. I have never balanced a rear wheel for a SSSA before. Tips on how to hold it on a balance shaft?
                            I am about to adjust the chain also....I found a post about making an adjustment gauge from cardboard on this site. It seems like Honda wants a loose chain on these Hawks.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Chain slack is set up the same way on every bike. And it's according to the chain manufacturer and it's shown in a picture of very many chain boxes. You set up an amount of deflection when the chain is at its tightest point in suspension travel. And that deflection I'd based on the span of the chain and the radii of the sprockets.

                              The chain is the tightest when the axis of rotation of the front sprocket, rear sprocket, and suspension pivot are all in a perfect line.

                              You do not have permission to view this gallery.
                              This gallery has 1 photos.

                              If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

                              The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X