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    #31
    Originally Posted by 69Falcon View Post

    No, back when I still had my stock gauges on my bike using the 110/70 on an F2 wheel and Hawk speedo drive, I compared it to a GPS speedo app on my phone and was off by 10%. So indicated 70mph was actually 63mph according to GPS. Because it is a ratio, the percentage off stays the same, so 20mph indicated would be 18mph or 100mph indicated would be 90mph.
    Well, mine always seems to be about ten mph optimistic so at 55 the speedo read almost exactly 65 (with the gps)...at slower speeds not as much (30 is about 25/24 on gps). I know that at ten % 100 would actually be 90, 90 would be 81, 70 would be 63, 60 would be 54, 50 would be 45 (my 45 is 53 indicated). Anyway, I'm use to where it is and don't want to learn a whole new system with a different tire size.

    Comment


      #32
      I ♡ Chicken Strips.

      If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

      The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

      Comment


        #33
        Yeah...but some of us are just plain chicken!!

        Comment


          #34
          Ok - guy's I need some advice from those w experience.

          I started off with this hawk being a winter project, change all the fluids, maintenance items, all the rubber components, fuel lines, manifolds, cush rubbers. Update the forks & shock, do a factory jet 3.0 kit, replace brake pads & lines - I can get all this from Hord. Change the tires. Find a find a collector and put a short can on it.

          Here's the thing - removed the tank, drained & flushed the coolant (clean no sediment) and had a good look at the fuel lines, air box and general condition.

          The lines and rubber components are supple, without cracks or any sign of stress - this hawk has ~ 10k miles, but must have been stored inside - it was very well taken care of... I think most of the bike is original, including plugs and air filter.

          I'm starting to think just change the fluids, tires & brakes - do the maintenance & ride it - I'm 150-155 lbs in my riding gear, so perhaps forks and shock might even work for me?

          Starting to think it would be a shame to mess up an all original hawk in this kind of condition.

          Thoughts?




          Comment


            #35
            There is nothing wrong with keeping it stock. They're beautiful. I'm a born again stocker... but I'm also a slip again down the slippery sloper.

            Things I consider necessary on every Hawk are:

            GVEs front (springs, too), good rear shock (and a shock sock). LED H4 lamp.

            ...and the things that always need changing: intake rubbers, cush drive dampers.
            ...and then the things I need to live: heated hand grips.

            If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

            The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

            Comment


              #36
              I’d recommend riding it before deciding what you “need” to change. Of course address the maintenance items right away.

              Comment


                #37
                Originally Posted by Ssnead View Post
                Ok - guy's I need some advice from those w experience.

                I started off with this hawk being a winter project, change all the fluids, maintenance items, all the rubber components, fuel lines, manifolds, cush rubbers. Update the forks & shock, do a factory jet 3.0 kit, replace brake pads & lines - I can get all this from Hord. Change the tires. Find a find a collector and put a short can on it.

                Here's the thing - removed the tank, drained & flushed the coolant (clean no sediment) and had a good look at the fuel lines, air box and general condition.

                The lines and rubber components are supple, without cracks or any sign of stress - this hawk has ~ 10k miles, but must have been stored inside - it was very well taken care of... I think most of the bike is original, including plugs and air filter.

                I'm starting to think just change the fluids, tires & brakes - do the maintenance & ride it - I'm 150-155 lbs in my riding gear, so perhaps forks and shock might even work for me?

                Starting to think it would be a shame to mess up an all original hawk in this kind of condition.

                Thoughts?



                My red 89 Hawk had <15k when I bought it 4 years ago. Like yours all the rubber parts were in pretty good shape so I did not replace any and 4 years later only replaced the carb to head rubbers and of course cush rubber. First was to make it safe and reliable. I put new tires on first which allowed checking the wheel bearings and grease the speedo drive. Then I took eccentric apart and cleaned and greased those bearings. Changed oil/filter/gas filter and antifreeze, blew out the air cleaner. So that was just a starting point. The first 2 years I put 4k on it and I think it only got frame sliders. Next 2 years, I wanted a change, it got a used Corbin Seat. It then stumbled onto a Kosman front wheel (just lucky I guess). Then
                Hord did the forks, I put a Fuel slip on muffer and Hord Jet kit with uni filters. Then came a Penske rear shock. Last item a Thermae radiator. I have all new water hoses waiting to go on. It is done pretty much done and I don't miss the totally stock bike.

                So what I did, I did over 4 years, you can do it too if you want. Take it slow and get to know the bike, you do not have to make changes all at one time to enjoy it. Even if you keep it stock you have made it yours, your way as long as you enjoy riding it is the main thing.




                Bill,
                89 Red Hawk GT, 97 Magna, FZ-09. Past in reverse order:, 97 VFR750F, 87 VFR400R, 88 Hawk, 86 SRX 600, 77 RD400, 79 CB650, 04 VFR, 88 Blue Hawk, 89 Red Hawk, Yamaha SRX600, Harley 1200C, Yamaha RD400, Harley 883R, Yamaha 750 tripple, Honda Vlx600, Honda 450, Honda 400, Honda Cb550F, Kawasaki H1, BMW R69US, Yamaha R5C 350, Honda 160, Bridgestone 175, 1950 Harley 74 w/sidecar, 65 Harley 250 Sprint, 1948 Harley and my 1st bike-1941 Harley 74 knucklehead my dad gave in1963.

                Comment


                  #38
                  Originally Posted by 69Falcon View Post
                  ... I compared it to a GPS speedo app on my phone and was off by 10%. So indicated 70mph was actually 63mph according to GPS. Because it is a ratio, the percentage off stays the same, so 20mph indicated would be 18mph or 100mph indicated would be 90mph.
                  I'd agree with this logic for the odometer, but the stock speedometer is a different (but related) animal.
                  The odometer is a fixed ratio, but the speedometer uses a metal cup on a spring (needle is on the cup), with a spinning magnet inside (connected to speedometer cable).
                  The force generated by the spinning magnet induces a torque on the cup which balances against a spring. The faster the magnet spins, the more the cup will spin before the spring balances it.
                  • worn out spring
                  • undone calibration
                  • weakened magnet
                  So the speedo can have an error that is different than the odometer error due to the above 3 causes. And I'm not sure it is a linear relationship. Of course, the variance can be trivial.


                  If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

                  The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

                  Comment


                    #39
                    ParcNHawk I learn something new everyday

                    ​​​​​​​Thanks !
                    "Hawk Porn" http://picasaweb.google.com/11124379...eat=directlink 1990 NT650-Penske 8981, Race-tech Springs & Gold Valves, Steve Lenac six-piston caliper & EBC rotor,SS Brake lines Ft / Rear lines through SSA ,VFR brake lever, F2 front wheel, F-120/70 R-160/60 Dunlop Roadsmart, Full-Supertrapp Exhaust, Stage 1 Jet kit, K&N Filter, Corbin Seat, Pro-Tec Clip-On's/ Past Rides...1986 VFR700F2 Interceptor / 1979 Yamaha Rd400 Daytona Special

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally Posted by Ssnead View Post
                      Ok - guy's I need some advice from those w experience.

                      I started off with this hawk being a winter project, change all the fluids, maintenance items, all the rubber components, fuel lines, manifolds, cush rubbers. Update the forks & shock, do a factory jet 3.0 kit, replace brake pads & lines - I can get all this from Hord. Change the tires. Find a find a collector and put a short can on it.

                      Here's the thing - removed the tank, drained & flushed the coolant (clean no sediment) and had a good look at the fuel lines, air box and general condition.

                      The lines and rubber components are supple, without cracks or any sign of stress - this hawk has ~ 10k miles, but must have been stored inside - it was very well taken care of... I think most of the bike is original, including plugs and air filter.

                      I'm starting to think just change the fluids, tires & brakes - do the maintenance & ride it - I'm 150-155 lbs in my riding gear, so perhaps forks and shock might even work for me?

                      Starting to think it would be a shame to mess up an all original hawk in this kind of condition.

                      Thoughts?



                      The stock suspension doesn't work for anyone over 100lbs and even then.... Iffy. You are going to want to address that I would imagine. But ride it first. It's pleanty safe for driving around town.

                      As far as the tendency people have to replace everything made of rubber, every wearable item and everything that could be considered a safety item.... I'm sure you will be fine. There is a tendency here to spend a lot of time and money to be "safe" but I think a lot of time and money is spent in the place of the knowledge that would allow someone to judge there components individually.


                      I can not tell you what your bike needs without seeing it. I would imagine it doesn't need everything replaced.
                      Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        I can inspect it

                        If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

                        The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

                        Comment


                          #42
                          Inspection may indeed be needed...

                          - just discovered this hole in crankcase - rock chip? - how potentially serious is this cracked crankcase? IMG_2936.JPGIMG_2935.JPG

                          Now I really need some advice - Can it be patched or must the engine be torn down and case welded up?

                          Thoughts? - bike does start up and idles nicely, was boggy on ride home, which I attributed to gummy carbs - but now I wondering of the extent of this damage.


                          Any tests I can do? I was planning on compression test this week, but I don't think will tell me much.

                          Thinking of draining the oil look for metal, and cut the filter in half...

                          Comment


                            #43
                            It's an ass-crack. Everybody has one.

                            It's a problem if you have two.

                            Perfectly normal.

                            If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

                            The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

                            Comment


                              #44
                              What ever rock hit yours hit both of my bike in the very same place. Don't panic. I remember seeing that 4 years ago when I bought my Red Hawk. Looks like someone put J B Weld in my Blue 88 rock chip hole.
                              Bill,
                              89 Red Hawk GT, 97 Magna, FZ-09. Past in reverse order:, 97 VFR750F, 87 VFR400R, 88 Hawk, 86 SRX 600, 77 RD400, 79 CB650, 04 VFR, 88 Blue Hawk, 89 Red Hawk, Yamaha SRX600, Harley 1200C, Yamaha RD400, Harley 883R, Yamaha 750 tripple, Honda Vlx600, Honda 450, Honda 400, Honda Cb550F, Kawasaki H1, BMW R69US, Yamaha R5C 350, Honda 160, Bridgestone 175, 1950 Harley 74 w/sidecar, 65 Harley 250 Sprint, 1948 Harley and my 1st bike-1941 Harley 74 knucklehead my dad gave in1963.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                It takes 3 rocks.

                                The first makes the hole.
                                The second chamfers the edge.
                                The last paints it to match the rest of the case.

                                If you were looking for a support group you're barking up the wrong tree. This place is fulla enablers dude. - Shooter77us

                                The bitterness of low quality lingers long after the thrill of a low price has gone. - RacerX450

                                Comment

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