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1994 Ducati Monster 900 - Should I?

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    #16
    Originally Posted by cloud09 View Post

    I wonder why it rattles like that. My BMW boxer has a dry clutch
    and makes no noise. Maybe because the BMW is shaft drive.
    It’s because BMW charges twice as much for a clutch job on a boxer as a Ducati Desmo valve adjustment, and BMW didn’t want to remind you every time you ride.

    At least you can go multiple 10k miles before needing a replacement clutch on a Boxer.
    93 MSF BRC
    ————————
    75 CB400F (93-94)
    90 CBR600F (94-94)
    88 NT650 (19–)

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      #17
      Originally Posted by cloud09 View Post
      I wonder why it rattles like that. My BMW boxer has a dry clutch
      and makes no noise. Maybe because the BMW is shaft drive.
      From the factory, the clutch cover is closed. I cut mine open (or there are open ones available) to make it louder. I'm sure BMW designed it to be as quiet as possible and likely also covered.
      Eric Y.
      1990 Hawk - Taka 92 in progress.
      https://www.hawkgtforum.com/forum/ho...roject-taka-92

      https://www.flickr.com/photos/eyuzon/albums/72157675070162792


      2001 VFR800i road trip bike.
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/eyuzon...57666415263457
      Detroit, MI

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        #18
        Monster is the original wannabe.Skip that old turd.Assemble a damn Hawk.

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          #19
          Originally Posted by behindthetimes View Post
          Monster is the original wannabe.Skip that old turd.Assemble a damn Hawk.
          Ya, but...

          It has a trellis frame and no one thinks you ride a night hawk


          I agree though. Unless you have no bike, in wich case do whatever get you on the road for the rest of the year.
          Not riding is terrible for the mindstate. Ask how i know.....
          Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

          Comment


            #20
            Originally Posted by riot View Post

            On the other hand, I could build a Hawk from all the bits I have, and I surely need another bike like a hole in the head.
            Crap, if you got all parts (assuming NOTHING is missing), you can put it back together in a weekend or a week of nights. Yes?? Wrenching is just as fulfilling anyway.

            And if you got that much on your plate, just say NO! I know how tempting it is to get something new. Take care of what you got or you'll get into a rabbit hole of too many sticks in the fire and nothing gets cooked. Something like that.....
            Eric Y.
            1990 Hawk - Taka 92 in progress.
            https://www.hawkgtforum.com/forum/ho...roject-taka-92

            https://www.flickr.com/photos/eyuzon/albums/72157675070162792


            2001 VFR800i road trip bike.
            https://www.flickr.com/photos/eyuzon...57666415263457
            Detroit, MI

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              #21
              Originally Posted by eyhonda View Post

              Crap, if you got all parts (assuming NOTHING is missing), you can put it back together in a weekend or a week of nights. Yes??
              I always think that. It always takes WAY longer.... .
              Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

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                #22
                Originally Posted by 6 View Post

                I always think that. It always takes WAY longer.... .
                Yes .....but the task that's never started......takes longer to finish.

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                  #23
                  riot if you've got all the parts, assemble the Hawk over the winter. IIRC you live out near Chicago, so riding season is rapidly coming to a close. Save the money, and build what you got.
                  Flock of Hawks | '13 Tacoma | '69 Falcon (currently getting reassembled!)
                  I've spent most of my money on women, beer, cars and motorcycles. The rest of it I just wasted.

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                    #24
                    Originally Posted by 69Falcon View Post
                    riot if you've got all the parts, assemble the Hawk over the winter. IIRC you live out near Chicago, so riding season is rapidly coming to a close. Save the money, and build what you got.
                    I don't think I've ever done a build of anything that I didn't have to go spend money to complete, so depending on what the goal is, it may just be more efficient and cost effective to buy and flip the Monster. Don't know the whole situation, but the Craigslist post is Chicago land.

                    Wait a week and if it's still not sold, you'll be able to make a lower offer.

                    Good luck! either way.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally Posted by 69Falcon View Post
                      riot if you've got all the parts, assemble the Hawk over the winter. IIRC you live out near Chicago, so riding season is rapidly coming to a close. Save the money, and build what you got.
                      This. And if you are planning on making mods, doing paint/polish work, making changes, add a LOT of time. Also depends on the bike.

                      The race bike, I have shown up to the track with the bike in bins on Thursday and practiced Friday. But that is a simple bike to assemble and all the mods where done and the kinks worked out. So I can strip the race bike to the frame and putt it together in a day. But I'm hella familiar with it. There is no electrical system to speak of and anything unnecessary is gone.

                      Street bike takes longer.


                      Last "quick" build I did was Chris's bike. I stripped it to the frame and went through it in about a week. His tail was with the bike, a subframe someone "made" and the tail light. None of it had ever been mounted. No thought to the electronics mounting, battery, seat, etc. It took longer to work out the rear end than it did to do the rest of the bike and I polished his frame.


                      Assembly is easy, building it hard.

                      I'm sure you know all this. It just seemed relevant to post.
                      Don't spend money and buy, spend time and learn.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally Posted by 6 View Post

                        This. And if you are planning on making mods, doing paint/polish work, making changes, add a LOT of time. Also depends on the bike.

                        The race bike, I have shown up to the track with the bike in bins on Thursday and practiced Friday. But that is a simple bike to assemble and all the mods where done and the kinks worked out. So I can strip the race bike to the frame and putt it together in a day. But I'm hella familiar with it. There is no electrical system to speak of and anything unnecessary is gone.

                        Street bike takes longer.


                        Last "quick" build I did was Chris's bike. I stripped it to the frame and went through it in about a week. His tail was with the bike, a subframe someone "made" and the tail light. None of it had ever been mounted. No thought to the electronics mounting, battery, seat, etc. It took longer to work out the rear end than it did to do the rest of the bike and I polished his frame.


                        Assembly is easy, building it hard.

                        I'm sure you know all this. It just seemed relevant to post.
                        Yes, it takes about a year with my current schedule from first fire to fully sorted on average for my bikes. Since I bought the Hawk, I have built (like really modified or restored) at least 3 bikes (Craptastic, SXV and the Champion Yamaha), and I have owned and sold a few others.

                        Once sorted, service is easy, its the sorting bit that is a pita. The FT bike is just now getting there.

                        I race maybe 5-6 weeknds a year, and go to the MX track 2-4 times. In a short Chicago summer it gets busy. Throw in the house, a few kids, and my full time job...

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                          #27
                          Appropriate:

                          I bought a thing.jpg

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                            #28
                            too many servicing and bad parts problems, don't think your monster would be any better than the rest.
                            "It's only getting worse."


                            MY rides: '97 VFR750, '90 Red Hawk, '88 Blue/Black Hawk, '86 RWB VFR700 (3), '86 Yamaha Radian, '90 VTR250, '89 VTR250 (2), '73 CB125, '66 Yamaha YL-1

                            Sold: '86 FJ1200, '92 ZX-7, '90 Radian, '73 CB750, '89 all-white Hawk, '88 blue Hawk, '86 FZ600, '86 Yam Fazer 700 , '89 VTR250, '87 VFR700F2, '86 VFR700F.

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