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Wheel Bearing removal tool review MOSTPLUS

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    Wheel Bearing removal tool review MOSTPLUS

    I had been stressing over buying a wheel bearing tool (blind bearing remover). I know that cheap tools usually are garbage. I just don;t want to spend a ton of money on something I will use once a year at best.

    The MOSTPLUS was on Ebay for about $40.00 USD shipped. Most of the kits I looked at had terrible reviews and so did this one. It just had LESS terrible reviews. I took the plunge and bought it.

    I am pleased to say it worked OK on a set of front wheel bearings. As long as you square up the collet on the bearing ID and tighten the crap out of it I think this tool might last through several uses.

    It's got a real nice slide hammer with it also....2 pounder it is.

    IMG_0273.JPG

    #2
    Or.....you can learn the old way....a hammer and a drift......touch/feel/skill/ear/experience.You can certainly break thing tightening threads.....just like smacking shit with a hammer and a block of wood. Just saying......the eccentric is cake.Wheel bearings? Beat em out beat em in.

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      #3
      Good info Realred96! I'm always looking to expand my tool collection.

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        #4
        While I do like specialty tools, wheel bearings aren't blind (like btt said). My big hammer and a long drift gets the job done in about 4 blows around the bearing. You just bump the inner spacer to the side a bit to get on the bearing edge.

        But that would be what you need for some front swingarm bearings. But I have never come across any of my swingarm bearings that need replacement when doing restorations. Not even the ball bearing side.

        Don't forget the inner spacer when installing the new bearings!!!! "Why does the wheel not want to spin when I tighten the axle?" Fuck.
        "I couldn't afford NOT to buy it!"

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          #5
          Originally Posted by Captain 80s View Post
          While I do like specialty tools, wheel bearings aren't blind (like btt said). My big hammer and a long drift gets the job done in about 4 blows around the bearing. You just bump the inner spacer to the side a bit to get on the bearing edge.

          But that would be what you need for some front swingarm bearings. But I have never come across any of my swingarm bearings that need replacement when doing restorations. Not even the ball bearing side.

          Don't forget the inner spacer when installing the new bearings!!!! "Why does the wheel not want to spin when I tighten the axle?" Fuck.
          LOL, I have done "leave that spacer out" thing before. Really sucked.

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            #6
            Originally Posted by Captain 80s View Post

            Don't forget the inner spacer when installing the new bearings!!!! "Why does the wheel not want to spin when I tighten the axle?" Fuck.
            Yeah. The PO on mine definitely forgot it, and it took me at least 30 minutes to figure out wth was going on.


            I went and spent the money on the Motion Pro tool. Just the 20mm and driver since that's most of my wheels. Was cheap enough, and works really well. Already went through 8 wheels with no issues. Did have to use a drift on a 15mm front. Not hard to do it that way, just take extra care getting the first one out nice and even.

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              #7
              So yeah, I tried a set of those blind bearing pullers and they didn't work so well. I was trying to get a pilot bearing out of a GM crank and it was mega stuck. I was trying to be smart and use the right tool for the job, and then the arbor stripped and afterwards was useless. At that point rather than fucking around with shitty chinese tools I just went into the kitchen and got a few slices of bread. Some of you probably have heard of this before. You just start tearing off pieces of bread and jamming it in the hole of the bearing, then find a dowel the size of the hole and use a hammer and poound it in. You occasionally have to refill the hole with bread but it will force the bearing out. This method will work on any blind bearing but obviously you want to be careful with aluminum casees and stuff. Likewise I have been told you could use grease but the bread was less messy for me and a lot cheaper in the long run.

              For moto wheels I just use a thick angle pick with a tip I have ground flat. I move it in far enough to be on the center spacer piece, then strike it once with a ball peen hammer and that will usually push the center support piece off center so I can get a long punch in to strike the back edge of the bearing and then I just move it around and walk the bearing out. Once you get one side out I usually just sledge the other one out with a piece of pipe When it comes time to put new ones in I put the bearings in a ziplock and sammich them in some dry ice (can pick up dry ice at most grocery stores in the seafood department) and then just use a propane torch to put a little heat on the bearing surface of the wheel and the bearings usually just plop right in. Just make sure you put the center collar inside before you put the second bearing on and I also have one of those HF bearing and seal driver sets to just set on there and give it a love tap to tell if it is driven home. If you do it enough times you will be able to tell by the sound it makes. I used to use a socket to drive in bearings and U-joints but one day I smashed the end of my socket so bad putting in some U-joints it closed up the 3/8 square drive hole and after that I decided to stop ruining sockets (I think that one was a snap on even, strangely).

              I am on the verge of getting one of those HF 20 ton presses which will probably alter my hammering methods some but like anything those sometimes take a while to build up an aresnal of arbors but the practice you do with units like those is to save old bearing's, cut the outer races off, and then with slight modifications you can usually make them into devices for pressing or pushing out bearings, especially if you do repetative bearing types (like Honda wheels and such).
              88 Blue Hawk GT - Under construction but rideable (guest approved)
              89 BlackHawk 2.0 - On the lift and being assembled
              90 Hawk GT (color as to yet be determined) - Still on the shelf in crates

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                #8
                Yeah, Chinese tools are a crap shoot I usually lose on. I hear you about the HF press, I need to find garage space for one of those.Super handy.

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